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Thread: Still

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    Still

    HI:

    Why in this sentence..."I still havenīt eaten" is still used before the Auxiliary and past participle? I thought that in a present perfect tense the adverb goes between HAVE and the PAST PASTICIPLE. Why is STILL used in this sentence like this? Thank you. The Alien!

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    Teia is offline Key Member
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    Re: Still

    Quote Originally Posted by thealienone2000 View Post
    HI:

    Why in this sentence..."I still havenīt eaten" is still used before the Auxiliary and past participle? I thought that in a present perfect tense the adverb goes between HAVE and the PAST PASTICIPLE. Why is STILL used in this sentence like this? Thank you. The Alien!
    Still can be placed before or immediately after the subject: but he still… / but still he….I still haven`t ...

    still - meaning and use

    We use still in questions, affirmative and negative sentences to indicate that something is not finished and that we are perhaps surprised or concerned about this. Because it is emphatic, it often carries considerable word stress:


    Is it still raining?
    ~ Yes, it's still raining. No chance of playing tennis today, I'm afraid.


    I still don't know whether Brendan will be coming to the engagement party. I've tried to reach him several times on the phone, but can't seem to get hold of him.

    Learning English | BBC World Service

    The adverb still has a similar meaning and use to already and yet, but, as Swan (ibid) says, it:

    " … is used to say that something is in the present, not the past - it has, perhaps surprisingly, not finished.

    She's still asleep.
    Is it still raining?
    I've been thinking for hours, but I still can't decide.
    You're not still seeing the Jackson boy, are you?"
    pg. 562

    Notice that it is used with the present simple and continuous tenses. Also, as with already and yet, the word still can be used with a past meaning as well. In this case, the past simple, continuous or perfect can be used:

    When we arrived they were still at the dinner table.
    When we arrived they were still having dinner.
    When we arrived they still hadn't finished dinner.
    already and yet adverbs english grammar learnenglish
    Present Perfect Tense,Continuous Exercise,Progressive,Simple Past,ESL Quiz,Grammar Exercises

    Finally, the adverb still sometimes causes trouble. As an adverb of time it should not be used at the beginning of a sentence (unless you particularly want to use a dramatic literary style). Normally at the beginning of a sentence it has the sense of nevertheless, all the same. And notice that in this sense still is always followed by a COMMA

    They lead pretty dull lives. Still, they have their grandchildren, and the garden.

    It really was a dreadful film. Still, I suppose I have seen worse.

    source : NELL.links

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