Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    angliholic's Avatar
    angliholic is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • Taiwan
      • Current Location:
      • Taiwan
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    2,988
    Post Thanks / Like

    Smile If oxygen is released in/into space

    If oxygen is released in space, what will it look like?
    If oxygen is released into the space, what will it look like?



    Do both of the above convey the same idea to you? Thanks.

  2. #2
    Horsa is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    557
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: If oxygen is released in/into space

    Not to me they don't.

    In the first 'space' the area between planets, stars, etc. and the oxygen is released from a point within that area. That is not from a point outside it.
    In the second, on the other hand, 'space' is some empty area the speaker has been conversing about with the listener (for example the space between the inner and outer parts of a thermos flask) and in this case the oxygen enters the space in question from the outside.

  3. #3
    angliholic's Avatar
    angliholic is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • Taiwan
      • Current Location:
      • Taiwan
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    2,988
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: If oxygen is released in/into space

    Thanks, Horsa, for the helpful reply.
    Just to make sure, is there any difference between "in" and "into" in the base sentence?

  4. #4
    Horsa is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    557
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: If oxygen is released in/into space

    For me yes, the same difference holds true. Although, on occasions a casual speaker might use 'in' in place of 'into'. However, this seems to be an academic situation so for British English speakers,at least, it would be unlikely.

  5. #5
    angliholic's Avatar
    angliholic is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • Taiwan
      • Current Location:
      • Taiwan
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    2,988
    Post Thanks / Like

    Smile Re: If oxygen is released in/into space

    Quote Originally Posted by Horsa View Post
    For me yes, the same difference holds true. Although, on occasions a casual speaker might use 'in' in place of 'into'. However, this seems to be an academic situation so for British English speakers,at least, it would be unlikely.
    Thanks, Horsa.
    I find the way you write is very amusing and English. I'd like to learn how to use the bolded expression correctly. Does it mean "it's still true/valid as for the difference between in and into?"

  6. #6
    Horsa is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    557
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: If oxygen is released in/into space

    Yes. Although, I wouldn't worry too much about using it.

Similar Threads

  1. a space cadet/a heavenly soldier
    By angliholic in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 30-Sep-2007, 12:50
  2. Oxygen synonyms
    By Boris O. in forum General Language Discussions
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 27-Aug-2007, 12:39
  3. previous / following day (+ space)
    By Katz in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 23-Mar-2007, 02:44
  4. outer space or just space
    By nimsooze in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 27-Feb-2007, 05:25

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •