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  1. #1
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    Default How do you call it?

    Hi,

    Everytime when I talk to someone, he always starts with "well..." in each sentence. Or someone who is addicted to the use of "C'mon, Man!" Something like 'platitude' or stereotype. I don't know the correct phrase. Hope you understand my question. 8)

  2. #2
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    I call them 'crutch words'. They help to keep the flow of the discussion, while you actually think about what you're going to say. As for everything, overusing them is no good.
    Sometimes, non-native speakers just think it sounds cool, or believe it will make him/her appear more fluent. If the conversation is riddled with mistakes, this is the same effect as wearing Church's or Berluti's shoes with a Nike track suit.

    FRC

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    Very interesting!

    How about "a pet phrase"?

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    Yes, this makes sense.

    FRC

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    Have you ever heard yawning can be contagious? If you see someone yawning, the next moment you yawn.

    Is verbalism a contagious disease? My friend likes to say 'really', when you think of her, you think of the crutch word "really". Out of the blue, I started to embed 'really' in my conversation. How can I describe this situation?

    :wink:

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    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    Have you ever heard yawning can be contagious? If you see someone yawning, the next moment you yawn.

    Is verbalism a contagious disease? My friend likes to say 'really', when you think of her, you think of the crutch word "really". Out of the blue, I started to embed 'really' in my conversation. How can I describe this situation?

    :wink:
    A copycat.

    BMO

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    I would say you contracted her verbal tic.
    You can catch local accents too (eg. british/texan/new-yorker...).
    I suppose it would take some time for most people to catch it though (whether it's a verbal tic or accent), as it sounds bad or bizarre before you get used to it.

    FRC

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    Very interesting!

    How about "a pet phrase"?
    A pet phrase is usually more conscious -- a choice. Many of these crutch words are habitual, such as: like, ya' know, well, etc. :wink:

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    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    Have you ever heard yawning can be contagious? If you see someone yawning, the next moment you yawn.

    Is verbalism a contagious disease? My friend likes to say 'really', when you think of her, you think of the crutch word "really". Out of the blue, I started to embed 'really' in my conversation. How can I describe this situation?

    :wink:
    Contagious or catching would be good. :wink:

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    Quote Originally Posted by Francois
    I would say you contracted her verbal tic.
    You can catch local accents too (eg. british/texan/new-yorker...).
    I suppose it would take some time for most people to catch it though (whether it's a verbal tic or accent), as it sounds bad or bizarre before you get used to it.

    FRC
    Thanks a lot, there. That is exactly what I wanted.

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