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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork
    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    Very interesting!

    How about "a pet phrase"?
    A pet phrase is usually more conscious -- a choice. Many of these crutch words are habitual, such as: like, ya' know, well, etc. :wink:
    Danke schoen. I see, crutch words are those you use in daily conversation unconsciously. But what is pet phrase by your definition as 'more conscious'? Do you mean it's more like slang or something, such as buddies, dudes, kiddo?

    :?

  2. #12
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    To me, a pet phrase is a favourite expression someone has, usually a little different form the norm, like people who say 'a tad' in the UK instead of 'a bit'.

  3. #13
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    I need more examples about pet phrase and crutch word to analysize the difference.

    Thank you a lot in advance.

  4. #14
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    crutch words are used to keep the flow of the discussion going, while the speaker thinks about what he's going to say and/or how.
    Eg. "Well, I would tend to think that she's, er, a bit off, you know what I mean."
    Maybe the speaker generally hardly ever use them, the term 'crutch word' doesn't imply anything about how often the speaker use it.
    On the contrary, 'pet phrase' suggests that the speaker likes the phrase and presumably use it pretty often.
    Eg. "He likes her, to say the least. He's treated her to a fancy restaurant, and that must have set him back, to say the least".
    The speaker seems to like the underlined phrase! It might well be a 'pet phrase' of his.

    FRC

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Francois
    crutch words are used to keep the flow of the discussion going, while the speaker thinks about what he's going to say and/or how.
    Eg. "Well, I would tend to think that she's, er, a bit off, you know what I mean."
    Maybe the speaker generally hardly ever use them, the term 'crutch word' doesn't imply anything about how often the speaker use it.
    Got it. Thanks. It doesn't really carry exact meaning itself just to keep the conversation successive.



    Quote Originally Posted by Francois
    On the contrary, 'pet phrase' suggests that the speaker likes the phrase and presumably use it pretty often.
    Eg. "He likes her, to say the least. He's treated her to a fancy restaurant, and that must have set him back, to say the least".
    The speaker seems to like the underlined phrase! It might well be a 'pet phrase' of his.

    FRC
    You have to do excercise everyday, at least(pet), um...(crutch) one hour everyday. Well...(crutch) you know(crutch)...you've been staying in the office all the time, and I can see your bottom grow into your chair. C'mon (crutch), at least(pet) stand up once every one hour and try to activate your body.

    Am I right? :D

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork
    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    Very interesting!

    How about "a pet phrase"?
    A pet phrase is usually more conscious -- a choice. Many of these crutch words are habitual, such as: like, ya' know, well, etc. :wink:
    Danke schoen. I see, crutch words are those you use in daily conversation unconsciously. But what is pet phrase by your definition as 'more conscious'? Do you mean it's more like slang or something, such as buddies, dudes, kiddo?

    :?
    We all have some favorite expressions or usages that we repeat. Computer programs have been written that can identify an unknown author by comparing a work to many known writings of a variety of authors. It is similar to a linguistic fingerprint.

  7. #17
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    I have questions about my 'Subject'.


    How do you calll it?
    What do you call it?

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    I have questions about my 'Subject'.


    How do you calll it?
    What do you call it?
    Good question, Blacknomi :) I wanted to ask the same thing.

  9. #19
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    I'd use 'what'.

  10. #20
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    What do you call it?

    Quote Originally Posted by Cambridge
    castles in the air
    plans or hopes that have very little chance of happening

    mirage
    a hope or desire that has no chance of being achieved

    Your talk is just like hot air. It's a castle in the air. It's simply a mirage.


    All the same meaning?

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