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  1. #1
    Unregistered Guest

    Default plural plans and clothes

    My plans for today are to go to the park
    My plan for today is to go to the park


    Is clothes always plural?

    Is this correct:

    The clothes that I have are just shirts

  2. #2
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    Default Re: plural plans and clothes

    Yes, that's correct. To describe a single shirt for example, you would say "a single item of clothing", or "an item of clothing"
    Moggy

  3. #3
    Dawood Usmani's Avatar
    Dawood Usmani is offline Senior Member
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    Question Re: plural plans and clothes

    [quote=Unregistered;227447]My plans for today are to go to the park
    My plan for today is to go to the park


    Since your plan is only one which is to go to the park, you should use singular verb. If you have more than one plan you should use plural verb such as My plans for today are to go to the park, buy some food, phone Ann etc.
    Hope this helps.
    Regards!
    Last edited by Dawood Usmani; 14-Dec-2007 at 03:44.

  4. #4
    Romeo4755 is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: plural plans and clothes

    I've got one more question about 'clothes'.

    Being formally a plural noun it goes often with a single-noun determiner: You haven't got much clothes on!
    (MUCH - meaning some total body of clothes: the clothes on a person, the clothes manufactured by a factory, etc.)
    (MANY - meaning several items of clothing: 'How many clothes should a girl have in her wardrobe?')

    The question is - are there any other peculiarities in using the word 'clothes' (not 'cloth' and its possible plural forms meaning textile - but the always-plural synonym of garments)?
    (maybe, some cases when 'clothes' goes with a single number verb or other single number determiners besides 'much' which combine with it?)

    Thank you very much.

  5. #5
    Anglika is offline No Longer With Us
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    Default Re: plural plans and clothes

    Quote Originally Posted by Romeo4755 View Post
    I've got one more question about 'clothes'.

    Being formally a plural noun it goes often with a single-noun determiner: You haven't got much clothes on! Never! "You haven't much clothing on" OR "You haven't many clothes on".
    (MUCH - meaning some total body of clothes: the clothes on a person, the clothes manufactured by a factory, etc.)
    (MANY - meaning several items of clothing: 'How many clothes should a girl have in her wardrobe?')

    The question is - are there any other peculiarities in using the word 'clothes' (not 'cloth' and its possible plural forms meaning textile - but the always-plural synonym of garments)?
    (maybe, some cases when 'clothes' goes with a single number verb or other single number determiners besides 'much' which combine with it?)

    Thank you very much.
    .

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