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Thread: such as II

  1. #11
    navi tasan is offline Key Member
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    I think it would be better to put a comma in 1 and 2.

    1a-I had a great time, as everybody did.
    or:
    1b-I had a great time, as did everybody.
    (unless you want to say that you did it in the same manner as everybody else, which is a strange thing to say.)

    2a-I made a stupid mistake, as Susan did.
    or:
    2b-I made a stupid mistake, as did Susan.

    Again, your sentence would be Ok if you made the mistake in the same manner as Susan.


    François is right. You have to say "a story" or "stories" in 3, but I really think that is a typo.

    As for 4, I think you need "as" instead of "like". But I think Mike might disagree and throw the sentence away lock, stock and barrel.

    4a-"I can't tell an interesting story such as yours."
    might be the best choice.

    I'd like to know what native speakers and especially Mike think of all this though.

    I never trust a non-native speaker, specially not myself!

  2. #12
    MikeNewYork's Avatar
    MikeNewYork is online now VIP Member
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    Default Re: such as II

    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    Mike, I'm wondering that sometimes you said you don't like the sentence? What do you mean by saying so? Does somebody else like it? Or it's just idiosyncrasy? The sentence is grammatically right, isn't it?
    Usually, when I say I don't like a sentence, it means that I think it is incorrect. Every now and then it just means that it is clumsy.

    I won't make such a huge mistake as he did. 'did' functions as 'verb phrase substitution' of the action happened before, which is 'he made a huge mistake.'
    No, it is not correct. We use the compund conjunction as....as to make a comparison. Or we use "such" to make a comparison. We don''t use them together.

    I won't make as huge a mistake as he did. (Note the use of the word "huge" before the indefinitie article. This is an unusual construction.)

    I won't make such a huge mistake. (The comparison is implied.)

    Similiar examples
    1. I had a great time as everybody did. (correct)
    2. I made a stupid mistake as Susan did. (correct)
    3. I can't tell story as interestingly as you do. (correct)
    4. I can't tell such an interesting story like yours. (correct)



    :? :?
    1. I had as great a time as everybody else (had). (comparison)
    1. I had a great time, as everybody did. (no comparison) (all had fun)

    2. I made as stupid a mistake as Susan (made). (comparison)
    2. I made a stupid mistake, as Susan did. (no comparison) (both made mistakes)

    3. I can't tell a story as interestingly as you (do). (comparison)
    3. I can't tell as interesting a story as you (do). (comparison)

    4. I can't tell such an interesting story. (implied comparison)
    4. I can't tell an interesting story like yours.

    Does that help?

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by navi tasan
    I never trust a non-native speaker, specially not myself!

    Thank you for the details, navi tasan. :D

    I can't figure out your last sentence. Do you mean you don't trust yoursefl? It's sounds grammatically incorrect, but I could be wrong.

  4. #14
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    Yes, as a non-native speaker he/she doesn't trust himself/herself -- especially himself/herself

    FRC

  5. #15
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    Default Re: such as II

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork

    4. I can't tell an interesting story like yours.

    Does that help?

    Yes, that helps. :D

    Question 1
    How do you like my following sentences?
    1-a. I won't make such a huge mistakes like his. -->comparison
    1-b. I won't make a huge mistakes like his. -->comparison


    Question 2
    1. I am as tall as you (are) -->comparison
    2. Jack is as perfect as John (is). -->comparison
    ==>I've noticed that the adjective in #1 is gradable, whereas the adjective in #2 is non-gradable.

    3. I am taller than you are. -->comparison
    4. Jack is more perfect than John is. --> comparison but weird, because I ==>think 'perfect' is an adjective that reaches its extreme. 'More' clashes with 'perfect'. Is that correct?


    :?

  6. #16
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    MikeNewYork is online now VIP Member
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    Default Re: such as II

    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    Question 1
    How do you like my following sentences?
    1-a. I won't make such a huge mistakes like his. -->comparison
    1-b. I won't make a huge mistakes like his. -->comparison
    1-b is great.

    1-a That such has got to go! :wink:


    Question 2
    1. I am as tall as you (are) -->comparison
    2. Jack is as perfect as John (is). -->comparison
    ==>I've noticed that the adjective in #1 is gradable, whereas the adjective in #2 is non-gradable.

    3. I am taller than you are. -->comparison
    4. Jack is more perfect than John is. --> comparison but weird, because I ==>think 'perfect' is an adjective that reaches its extreme. 'More' clashes with 'perfect'. Is that correct?


    :?
    1. good
    2. OK. It is a bit strange, but I'd take it.

    3. good.
    4. More clashes with perfect in many contexts, but not all. For example.

    John would be perfect for the role of Hamlet.
    I think Fred would be more perfect.

    When perfect refers to matching the rewuirements of a standard, I see the word as somewhat gradable.

  7. #17
    RonBee's Avatar
    RonBee is offline Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    Quote Originally Posted by navi tasan
    I never trust a non-native speaker, specially not myself!

    Thank you for the details, navi tasan. :D

    I can't figure out your last sentence. Do you mean you don't trust yoursefl? It's sounds grammatically incorrect, but I could be wrong.
    No, I don't think you are wrong. In that form we would use me and not myself. The word myself would not be acting as a reflexive pronoun in that sentence. Try:
    • I never trust a non-native speaker, specially not me!

    Or:
    • I never trust a non-native speaker, and I specially don't trust myself.


    :)

    (Although the meaning comes through, the grammar is, I think, incorrect.)

    8)

  8. #18
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    Default Re: such as II

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork
    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    Question 1
    How do you like my following sentences?
    1-a. I won't make such a huge mistakes like his. -->comparison
    1-b. I won't make a huge mistakes like his. -->comparison
    1-b is great.
    1-a That such has got to go! :wink:
    And this?
    Speaker A: I won't make such a huge mistake! :D

    Speaker B: What mistakes?

    Speaker A: Like yours.



    I understand the "perfect" part now. Thank a bunch. :D

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    I never trust a non-native speaker, specially not me!
    I never trust a non-native speaker, and I specially don't trust myself.

    (Although the meaning comes through, the grammar is, I think, incorrect.)

    Hi, Bee

    Can I omit 'not' in your first sentence? :D

  10. #20
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Omit away.

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