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  1. #11
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    Default Re: passive-agressive???

    Quote Originally Posted by beeja
    Hi Mike,

    Thanks for your clarification. It helps me a lot!! Well, I have something to share with you.
    You are very welcome.

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork
    3. More context is needed. It means that the integrity of some entity is at risk.
    Actaully I'm quite confused about the meaning of "integrity". From dictionary, it can mean "honest", "united" or "strong belief". From the context, it says "Integrity is about creating a set of operating values and then living true to them. Integrity lays the foundation of trust and respect." Does it imply "honest" or "straight-forward"?

    Re the question no. 3, the context is "People who don't do what they say, they are going to do are showing a lack of respect for the rest of us. Their integrity is essentially at stake."

    So, I think that it might say that people who don't do what they say they are going to do, they have no integrity or they are not honest. Can??

    :(
    Yes. When people repeatedly fail to follow through on their promises, they are not being honest. People will learn not to trust such people. Integrity includes those issues of honesty and trustworthiness.

    5. The Partnership Imperative is the title. The context of that chapter is talking about partnership. I don't know why the author used the word "Imperative". This word is not used in this chapter at all.

    In that case, the word "imperative" means that partnership is extremely important for an organization to be successful.

  2. #12
    beeja is offline Member
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    Default Re: passive-agressive???

    One more question about the word "affirmation". In this book, it said the "affirmation" is important to let people know that the things they do are important. It seems to thank or praise when they are doing good. Why don't they use the word "praising" or "appreciation" instead. Any idea? :wink:

  3. #13
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    Default Re: passive-agressive???

    Quote Originally Posted by beeja
    One more question about the word "affirmation". In this book, it said the "affirmation" is important to let people know that the things they do are important. It seems to thank or praise when they are doing good. Why don't they use the word "praising" or "appreciation" instead. Any idea? :wink:
    I don't know why they chose that particular word. One could say that affirmation is broader than praise, thanks, and appreciation, and it includes all three.

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