Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. RL's Avatar

    • Join Date: Jun 2004
    • Posts: 65
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #1

    celebrator/celebrant

    Hi! :)

    My english professor once mentioned that it's incorrect to use the word CELEBRANT (example: birthday celebrant), she says it's supposed to be CELEBRATOR. Is it true?! I still hear people use Celebrant more than Celebrator. Is there any difference between the 2?!

    Thank you! :D

  2. RL's Avatar

    • Join Date: Jun 2004
    • Posts: 65
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #2

    celebrator/celebrant

    Hi! :)

    My english professor once mentioned that it's incorrect to use the word CELEBRANT (example: birthday celebrant), she says it's supposed to be CELEBRATOR. Is it true?! I still hear people use Celebrant more than Celebrator. Is there any difference between the 2?!

    Thank you! :D

  3. Susie Smith
    Guest
    #3

    Re: celebrator/celebrant

    Quote Originally Posted by RL
    Hi! :)

    My english professor once mentioned that it's incorrect to use the word CELEBRANT (example: birthday celebrant), she says it's supposed to be CELEBRATOR. Is it true?! I still hear people use Celebrant more than Celebrator. Is there any difference between the 2?!

    Thank you! :D
    The American Heritage dictionary says:
    celキeキbrant (sオl套-brnt) n. 1.a. A person who participates in a religious ceremony or rite. b. The priest officiating at the celebration of the Eucharist. 2. A participant in a celebration.
    覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧
    USAGE NOTE: Strictly speaking, celebrant should be reserved for an official participant in a religious ceremony or rite. In an earlier survey, however, a majority of the Usage Panel accepted the use of celebrant to mean 殿 participant in a celebration (as in New Year's Eve celebrants). In this more general sense, celebrator is an undisputed alternative.

  4. Susie Smith
    Guest
    #4

    Re: celebrator/celebrant

    Quote Originally Posted by RL
    Hi! :)

    My english professor once mentioned that it's incorrect to use the word CELEBRANT (example: birthday celebrant), she says it's supposed to be CELEBRATOR. Is it true?! I still hear people use Celebrant more than Celebrator. Is there any difference between the 2?!

    Thank you! :D
    The American Heritage dictionary says:
    celキeキbrant (sオl套-brnt) n. 1.a. A person who participates in a religious ceremony or rite. b. The priest officiating at the celebration of the Eucharist. 2. A participant in a celebration.
    覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧
    USAGE NOTE: Strictly speaking, celebrant should be reserved for an official participant in a religious ceremony or rite. In an earlier survey, however, a majority of the Usage Panel accepted the use of celebrant to mean 殿 participant in a celebration (as in New Year's Eve celebrants). In this more general sense, celebrator is an undisputed alternative.

  5. RL's Avatar

    • Join Date: Jun 2004
    • Posts: 65
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #5

    Re: celebrator/celebrant

    Quote Originally Posted by Susie Smith
    Quote Originally Posted by RL
    Hi! :)

    My english professor once mentioned that it's incorrect to use the word CELEBRANT (example: birthday celebrant), she says it's supposed to be CELEBRATOR. Is it true?! I still hear people use Celebrant more than Celebrator. Is there any difference between the 2?!

    Thank you! :D
    The American Heritage dictionary says:
    celキeキbrant (sオl套-brnt) n. 1.a. A person who participates in a religious ceremony or rite. b. The priest officiating at the celebration of the Eucharist. 2. A participant in a celebration.
    覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧
    USAGE NOTE: Strictly speaking, celebrant should be reserved for an official participant in a religious ceremony or rite. In an earlier survey, however, a majority of the Usage Panel accepted the use of celebrant to mean 殿 participant in a celebration (as in New Year's Eve celebrants). In this more general sense, celebrator is an undisputed alternative.
    I see. Thanks, Susie Smith :)

  6. RL's Avatar

    • Join Date: Jun 2004
    • Posts: 65
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #6

    Re: celebrator/celebrant

    Quote Originally Posted by Susie Smith
    Quote Originally Posted by RL
    Hi! :)

    My english professor once mentioned that it's incorrect to use the word CELEBRANT (example: birthday celebrant), she says it's supposed to be CELEBRATOR. Is it true?! I still hear people use Celebrant more than Celebrator. Is there any difference between the 2?!

    Thank you! :D
    The American Heritage dictionary says:
    celキeキbrant (sオl套-brnt) n. 1.a. A person who participates in a religious ceremony or rite. b. The priest officiating at the celebration of the Eucharist. 2. A participant in a celebration.
    覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧
    USAGE NOTE: Strictly speaking, celebrant should be reserved for an official participant in a religious ceremony or rite. In an earlier survey, however, a majority of the Usage Panel accepted the use of celebrant to mean 殿 participant in a celebration (as in New Year's Eve celebrants). In this more general sense, celebrator is an undisputed alternative.
    I see. Thanks, Susie Smith :)

  7. Susie Smith
    Guest
    #7

    Re: celebrator/celebrant

    Quote Originally Posted by RL
    Quote Originally Posted by Susie Smith
    Quote Originally Posted by RL
    Hi! :)

    My english professor once mentioned that it's incorrect to use the word CELEBRANT (example: birthday celebrant), she says it's supposed to be CELEBRATOR. Is it true?! I still hear people use Celebrant more than Celebrator. Is there any difference between the 2?!

    Thank you! :D
    The American Heritage dictionary says:
    celキeキbrant (sオl套-brnt) n. 1.a. A person who participates in a religious ceremony or rite. b. The priest officiating at the celebration of the Eucharist. 2. A participant in a celebration.
    覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧
    USAGE NOTE: Strictly speaking, celebrant should be reserved for an official participant in a religious ceremony or rite. In an earlier survey, however, a majority of the Usage Panel accepted the use of celebrant to mean 殿 participant in a celebration (as in New Year's Eve celebrants). In this more general sense, celebrator is an undisputed alternative.
    I see. Thanks, Susie Smith :)
    You're welcome. :)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •