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Thread: screwed

  1. #1
    bieasy is offline Senior Member
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    Cool screwed

    In a movie I saw a lawyer said nervously: 'I'm still screwed'

    Can it mean: 'I'm still f...ed'? 'I'm still disappointed'? 'I'm still upset'? All three? None of them? What else could that mean?

  2. #2
    Naamplao is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: screwed

    Quote Originally Posted by bieasy View Post
    In a movie I saw a lawyer said nervously: 'I'm still screwed'

    Can it mean: 'I'm still f...ed'? 'I'm still disappointed'? 'I'm still upset'? All three? None of them? What else could that mean?
    No, "to be screwed" is much stronger than "disappointed" or "upset". The "f" word is a little stronger than "screwed"

    As you are probably aware, "screwed" and the stronger "f" word (and their variations) have many many meanings that are very context sensitive.

    In this case the context indicates that the lawyer is in a difficult position. Perhaps he fears losing his trial case, or he has given very bad advice to a client and cannot correct the problem easily.

    By using the word "still" in the sentence, it indicates that he has tried to solve this problem but his attempt failed. The lawyer in saying that he is screwed indicates that he sees no solution to his dilemma and he faces a major disaster.

  3. #3
    jctgf is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: screwed

    hi,

    the best translation for "screwed", in this context, is "ferrado".

    regards

  4. #4
    bieasy is offline Senior Member
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    Cool Re: screwed

    Quote Originally Posted by Naamplao View Post
    No, "to be screwed" is much stronger than "disappointed" or "upset". The "f" word is a little stronger than "screwed"

    As you are probably aware, "screwed" and the stronger "f" word (and their variations) have many many meanings that are very context sensitive.

    In this case the context indicates that the lawyer is in a difficult position. Perhaps he fears losing his trial case, or he has given very bad advice to a client and cannot correct the problem easily.

    By using the word "still" in the sentence, it indicates that he has tried to solve this problem but his attempt failed. The lawyer in saying that he is screwed indicates that he sees no solution to his dilemma and he faces a major disaster.
    Thank you!

  5. #5
    bieasy is offline Senior Member
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    Cool Re: screwed

    Quote Originally Posted by jctgf View Post
    hi,

    the best translation for "screwed", in this context, is "ferrado".

    regards
    Which means I'm f....ed Thank you

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