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  1. #11
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    Default Re: question

    Quote Originally Posted by Taka
    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    As synonyms,

    You should be careful when crossing the street. (OK)
    You should be careful in crossing the street. (OK)
    I see. But my question is, isn't it possible to interpret such "in" as "in regard to"?

    What do you think?
    If you mean, in regards to as a synonym for about, then I'd say you've got a case. It's a far reach, though. 8)

    1. You should be careful in (the following matter:)crossing the street.

    2. You should be careful in regards to (i.e. about) crossing the street.

    I also agree with tdol's suggestion. 8)

  2. #12
    Taka is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    I'm not very keen on using 'in regard to' here, but could put it at the start as an introductory phrase. I would use the phrase as an introductoru marker rather than for a conclusion.
    Thank you, tdol. But I'm not asking about your preference. My question is, why is it that when it is used as an introductory phrase, it could be "in regard to", whereas when put in the end of the sentence, then "when"?

  3. #13
    Taka is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: question

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    If you mean, in regards to as a synonym for about, then I'd say you've got a case. It's a far reach, though.

    1. You should be careful in (the following matter:)crossing the street.

    2. You should be careful in regards to (i.e. about) crossing the street.
    OK. Then, next question.

    Why do you think semantically "in" can be either "when" or "in regard to/about" in the same sentence? IMO, they are different from each other.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Taka
    OK. Then, next question.

    Why do you think semantically "in" can be either "when" or "in regard to/about" in the same sentence? IMO, they are different from each other.
    First of all, that's your argument, not mine. :D Second of all, in is synonymous with respect to (Please consult an English dictionary--as you well know, English-Japanese dictionaries are not all that reliable--), which is synonymous with in regards to:

    1. in ~ with respect to | with respect to ~ in regard to
    2. in ~ in regards to (Semantic Extension)

    3. in regards to ~ about
    4. in ~ about (Semantic extention)

    Semantic extension has already been mentioned, ne?

  5. #15
    Taka is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: question

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    Second of all, in is synonymous with respect to
    I know that, Casiopea.

    OK, let me tell you what I'm wondering. For example, "It is important when..." and "It is important with respect to..." are not really the same, right? But according to the grammatical rule, you can say "It is important in..." instead for both sentences.

    If "in" could mean either "with respect to" or "when", how do you tell the difference in a sentence where the distinction is not so clear? Or, is it that for you native speakers there is not much semantical difference between "when" and "with respect to/about", and that's why you use the same "in" for both?

  6. #16
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Pre\post-modifiers?

  7. #17
    Taka is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    Pre\post-modifiers?
    OK, my understanding is , you said:

    in deciding where to settle, one has to balance these two factors. =in regard to/with respect to deciding where to settle, one has to balance these two factors.

    whereas;

    one has to balance these two factors in deciding where to settle.=one has to balance these two factors when he/she decides where to settle.

    Why? they are the same phrase "in deciding where to settle"??

  8. #18
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    tdol?

  9. #19
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    I was suggesting that if you wanted to use 'regard', it would fit better at the beginning of the sentence rather than in the middle, where it is rather cumbersome.

  10. #20
    Taka is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    I was suggesting that if you wanted to use 'regard', it would fit better at the beginning of the sentence rather than in the middle, where it is rather cumbersome.
    OK. I understand.

    Now, could you please give me your comments on this one? (This question is originally given to Casiopea).

    Quote Originally Posted by Taka
    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    Second of all, in is synonymous with respect to
    OK, let me tell you what I'm wondering. For example, "It is important when..." and "It is important with respect to..." are not really the same, right? But according to the grammatical rule, you can say "It is important in..." instead for both sentences.

    If "in" could mean either "with respect to" or "when", how do you tell the difference in a sentence where the distinction is not so clear? Or, is it that for you native speakers there is not much semantical difference between "when" and "with respect to/about", and that's why you use the same "in" for both?

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