Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    ucom is offline Newbie
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    1
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Verb + Adjective

    Hello,

    Most English speaking people know the rule when using human sense verbs such as look, sound, smell, taste, feel (five of them). These verbs are followed by adjectives, not by adverbs as common, for example:

    The hi-fi set sounds good (not well)
    The salad tastes delicious (not deliciously)


    Nevertheless, we also have some other special verbs which require adjectives followed rather than adverbs, such as remain, seem, become, come, keep, stay etc... For instance, please consider some sentences below:

    That question remains mysterious (not mysteriously).
    I still keep busy now (not busily)
    The theory become true (not truly)
    My dream comes true (not truly)
    The answer seems different (not differently) from what he wants to know


    So, someone please helps me summarize all the verbs like those above or shows me a simple rule to remember and use them in correct way.
    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    1,554
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Verb + Adjective

    They are all adjectives because they describe things, not actions.

    Taking the first one: "That question remains mysterious". What word in this sentence does "mysterious" describe? It is the question which is mysterious -- it was mysterious in the past and it is mysterious in the present.

    If you use an adverb -- "That question remains mysteriously" -- it changes the mean. "Mysteriously" now describes the verb; the sentence means that the question remains, and it does so in a mysterious manner. We expected the question to go away, but it hasn't, and it is this which mystifies us. (The question itself is a normal question, and it isn't mysterious at all.)

    (This word order, though, would be a bit unnatural. We would normally say: "Mysteriously, that question remains" or: "That question mysteriously remains".)

    If you are describing an action, use an adverb.

    But if you are describing a thing, use an adjective.

  3. #3
    ruziniu_yang is offline Newbie
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    3
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Verb + Adjective

    How accurate the answer is! I suddenly see the light about it.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    12
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Verb + Adjective

    You better take a look at the comon list of linking verbs ( which are followed by an adjective)
    Common linking verbs:

    appear John appeared happy when the company promoted him.beThe graduate students are in Classroom South, Room 106.feelShe felt really happy with the new baby.lieThe pieces lay scattered over the floor.lookThis person looks really tired.remainEverybody remained silent for a few minutes.seemThis secretary seems (to be) very efficient.smellThat perfume smelled so fresh.sound She sounded very surprised when she heard the news.stayEverybody stayed calm when the fire alarm went off.tasteThis grapefruit tastes very bitter.
    become He became a successful business man.get She got upset with her students.growThe professor grew unhappy because the students were not listening well. fallMy brother fell in love at the party.proveThe new secretary proved (to be) very friendly.runThe children ran wild.turnThe milk turned sour.
    Good luck
    Ruholla Kazemi

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    12
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Verb + Adjective

    Some verbs are followed by an adjective, which are called linking verbs. Here I give you a list of common linking verbs:

    appear
    EX: John appeared happy when the company promoted him.

    be
    EX: The graduate students are in Classroom South, Room 106.

    feel
    EX:She felt really happy with the new baby.

    lie
    EX: The pieces lay scattered over the floor.

    look
    EX:This person looks really tired.

    remain
    EX: Everybody remained silent for a few minutes.

    seem
    EX: This secretary seems (to be) very efficient.

    smell
    EX: That perfume smelled so fresh.

    sound
    EX: She sounded very surprised when she heard the news.

    stay
    EX: Everybody stayed calm when the fire alarm went off.

    taste
    EX: This grapefruit tastes very bitter.

    become
    EX: He became a successful business man.

    get
    EX: She got upset with her students.

    grow
    EX: The professor grew unhappy because the students were not listening well.

    prove
    EX: The new secretary proved (to be) very friendly.

    run
    EX: The children ran wild.

    turn
    EX: The milk turned sour.

    Good luck


    Ruholla Kazemi
    EFL Teacher
    EAP Teacher
    English Teacher Trainer
    Last edited by godfingers; 14-Feb-2008 at 00:48.

Similar Threads

  1. sentence structure question
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 17-Jan-2008, 09:53
  2. Usage Of "does"
    By crool in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 09-Aug-2007, 16:56
  3. Verb or be plus adjective
    By krishna_ab in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-Mar-2006, 13:18
  4. noun phrases
    By sting in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 26-Aug-2004, 21:52
  5. english grammar
    By Anonymous in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 17-Oct-2003, 15:27

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •