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Thread: for and because

  1. #1
    fatzo is offline Newbie
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    Default for and because

    What's the difference between the subordinator because and the coordinator for? when do we use each? Can you clarify this with examples?

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    Buddhaheart is offline Member
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    Default Re: for and because

    Briefly ‘because’ & ‘for’ as conjunctions share the same meaning as ‘since, for the reason that’. We’ll use an example to explain the difference: We play soccer because (~ for reason that; since; for) we enjoy the game. You can say Because we enjoy soccer, we play the game. You can’t however say *For we enjoy soccer, we play the game. ‘Because’ can be used to introduce a subordinate clause (we enjoy soccer) that gives the reason for the main clause (we play the game). ‘For’ can only introduce a clause following the main clause. Its use is more formal in that sense. We therefore can say We play soccer, for we enjoy it.

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