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  1. #1
    belly_ttt is offline Senior Member
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    Default Something misunderstood of Oxford dictionary

    1) I have seen some words marked : (Both NAmE, Both BrE), what are they supposed to mean?

    2) Some words (meaning, for example) is marked "uncount and count" noun (u,c), so when to use which?
    Ex: 1) meaning (of sth) [U, C] the thing or idea that a sound, word, sign, etc. represents:
    What’s the meaning of this word?
    Words often have several meanings.
    ‘Honesty’? He doesn’t know the meaning of the word!

  2. #2
    Anglika is offline No Longer With Us
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    Default Re: Something misunderstood of Oxford dictionary

    Quote Originally Posted by belly_ttt View Post
    1) I have seen some words marked : (Both NAmE, Both BrE), what are they supposed to mean? "Noun American English [spelling]" "Both spelling used in British English".

    2) Some words (meaning, for example) is marked "uncount and count" noun (u,c), so when to use which?
    Ex: 1) meaning (of sth) [U, C] the thing or idea that a sound, word, sign, etc. represents:
    What’s the meaning of this word? = uncountable form - the word has a meaning.
    Words often have several meanings. = countable form - words can have more than one meaning.
    ‘Honesty’? He doesn’t know the meaning of the word!
    You have to learn when to use the different forms, just as children do, but example and practice.

  3. #3
    belly_ttt is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Something misunderstood of Oxford dictionary

    Not clear,
    "Noun American English [spelling], both spelling used in BrE".... but some words have Both NAme marks whlist some have Both BrE marks... If they mean that "used both in American English and British English", why don't they use unanimous signal?

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Something misunderstood of Oxford dictionary

    Actually, NAmE means "North American English".

  5. #5
    belly_ttt is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Something misunderstood of Oxford dictionary

    I know, but why don't they use an unanimous signal like:" Both BrE and NAmE"?

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Something misunderstood of Oxford dictionary

    I'm not sure I've completely understood your question, but "Both BrE and NAmE" is ambiguous.

    It could mean that both spellings are used in both countries, but it could also mean that only the latter spelling is used in both countries.

  7. #7
    belly_ttt is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Something misunderstood of Oxford dictionary

    But I don't understand the mere "Both NAmE" and "Both BrE" into the bargain. I know that there are two countries in North America both speak English are Canada and The US, but how about the Brtitish English? "Both spelling used in British English?

  8. #8
    belly_ttt is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Something misunderstood of Oxford dictionary

    And what does "noun American English [spelling]" means?

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