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  1. #11
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    RonBee is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: Growing Up Female in Iran

    Quote Originally Posted by beascarpetta View Post
    As Satrapi said, Iranian boys under the age of 14 were mostly betrayed by their teachers,

    who gave them plastic keys painted a bright gold as a means of opening the doors of

    heaven to them in case they got killed in the war.

    They promised them a place where "there will be plenty of food, women and houses made

    of gold and diamonds" (Satrapi 100). As a consequence ,the boys were eager to go since

    they had not seen many women or lots of food in their lives so far.

    Many fell into the trap and went to war with the keys they had on them.
    That's good! More?

  2. #12
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    Default Re: Growing Up Female in Iran

    This book clearly is about Satrapi's childhood , and the way she perceived the world she then was part of.

    Satrapi was nine at the time of the 1979 Islamic Revolution, and she grew up as the veil was introduced

    and schools were segregated.

    A major portion of the book deals with the gender issue.

    Much is told from a child's often partially uncomprehending point of view.

    Concepts such as class differences and various ideologies often aren't clear to the mind of a nine-year-old

    girl and reactions such as to the veil are often childlike.

    When Satrapi rallies againgst sexual discrimination she refers to the way her relatives,such as her uncle,or her mother were victimised during that time.

    On the one hand, men were tortured and betrayed in order to induce them to go into battle.On the other hand, women were forced to do what they did not want to do,like wearing the veil, making do without jewelry and tight pants, in short anything to send male imagination into overdrive.

    There were many more rules/laws to be obeyed to the letter, simply for survival's sake.

    When the family maid falls in love with the son of the family next door, Satrapi's parents' class

    consciousness is closely scrutinised by their young daughter,who cannot believe how her otherwise

    liberal parents condemn the maid for ignoring class boundaries.

    The nine-year-old girl comforts the teenage maid: "We were not in the same social class but at least we were in the same bed."

  3. #13
    RonBee's Avatar
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    Default Re: Growing Up Female in Iran

    Quote Originally Posted by beascarpetta View Post
    This book clearly is about Satrapi's childhood and the way she perceived the world that she was a part of.

    Satrapi was nine at the time of the 1979 Islamic Revolution, and she grew up as the veil was introduced

    and schools were segregated.

    A major portion of the book deals with the gender issue.

    Much is told from a child's often partially uncomprehending point of view.

    Concepts such as class differences and various ideologies often aren't clear to the mind of a nine-year-old

    girl and reactions such as to the veil are often childlike.

    When Satrapi rallies againgst sexual discrimination she refers to the way her relatives,such as her uncle,or her mother were victimised during that time.

    On the one hand, men were tortured and betrayed (tricked, lied to, deceived) in order to induce them to go into battle.On the other hand, women were forced to do what they did not want to do,like wearing the veil, making do without jewelry and tight pants, in short anything that might send the male imagination into overdrive.

    There were many more rules/laws to be obeyed to the letter, simply for survival's sake.

    When the family maid falls in love with the son of the family next door, Satrapi's parents' class

    consciousness is closely scrutinised by their young daughter,who cannot believe how her otherwise

    liberal parents condemn the maid for ignoring class boundaries.

    The nine-year-old girl comforts the teenage maid: "We were not in the same social class but at least we were in the same bed."
    Excellent!

  4. #14
    RonBee's Avatar
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    Default Re: Growing Up Female in Iran

    Quote Originally Posted by ddsa View Post
    Persepolis, demonstrates the downfall of a country, the rule that made to restricted peoples, and the dehumanize treatment to men and women. In the book it shows a lot of violence, no matter men or women there are unfortunate event happen in their life. Such as men were torture to death in jail, and women were tortures to death on the street. In many examples that Satrapi given sounds unrealistic, and ridiculous, however it does happened in her life.
    Persepolis tells the story of the downfall of a country. The dehumanizing treatment happened to both men and women. There is a lot of violence in the book. Unfortunate things happen to both men and women. Men were tortured to death in jail, and women were tortured to death on the street. The many examples of dehumanizing treatment Satrapi tells about seem unreal, but she either experienced or witnessed those events.


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