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    • Join Date: Nov 2007
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    #1

    Cool Use of correct prepositions

    Dear teacher,

    A) Can you please help me differentiate between "before" and "until"

    For example:
    <OL style="LIST-STYLE-TYPE: decimal">I could not get to work before/until 5:00 pm.
    I will not be able to see you before/until tomorrow.
    You will not be able to speak english fluently before/until you fully
    Last edited by Gilles L; 06-Dec-2007 at 01:16.


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
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    #2

    Re: Use of correct prepositions

    A) Can you please help me differentiate between "before" and "until"

    For example:
    I could not get to work before/until 5:00 pm.
    I will not be able to see you before/until tomorrow.
    You will not be able to speak english fluently before/until you fully

    In these sentences they mean almost the same thing:

    I could not get to work before/until 5:00 pm. This means I was not able to get to work any earlier than 5pm. I was not able to get to work at 4pm or 4:30 pm or 4:55 pm.


    I am not able to see you before/until tomorrow. These mean I am not able to see you any earlier or sooner than tomorrow.

    The last sentence was not finished but it appears that they also mean the same thing for both.

    I hope that helps


    • Join Date: Aug 2007
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    #3

    Re: Use of correct prepositions

    I can understand your confusion these words can have very similar meanings.

    Until is used chiefly as a preposition as a function word to indicate continuance (as of an action or condition) to a specified time <stayed until morning> It is also used like before <not available until tomorrow> <we don't open until ten>

    Before is has the function of adverb or adjective to mean "in advance" <marching on before> or at an earlier time <the night before> <knew her from before>

    In your examples I think the correct choices are:

    I could not get to work until 5:00 pm. or I can not get to work before 5:00 pm. and I will not be able to see you until tomorrow. or I can't see you before/until tomorrow.

    In many cases you can use either word and the meaning will be the same.

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