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    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 1,538
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    #1

    sixteen times heavier, fifteen times heavier

    CAMBRIDGE LEARNER'S DICTIONARY, heavy:

    Oxygen is sixteen times heavier than hydrogen.

    Could we say
    'Oxygen is fifteen times heavier than hydrogen.'
    without changing its original meaning (as we Chinese would always think)?

    Thank you very much.

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • Scotland
      • Current Location:
      • Thailand

    • Join Date: Nov 2007
    • Posts: 325
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    #2

    Re: sixteen times heavier, fifteen times heavier

    I'm not sure if I understand your question, but you can't change sixteen to fifteen without changing the meaning. Sixteen and fifteen are not the same.

    The second statement is fine grammatically.

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