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  1. #1
    angliholic's Avatar
    angliholic is offline Key Member
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    Smile I bought Kim dinner to make him up for being late.

    I bought Kim dinner to make him up for being late.




    Is "him" in the above optional or must I delete it? Thanks.

  2. #2
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    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: I bought Kim dinner to make him up for being late.

    Quote Originally Posted by angliholic View Post
    I bought Kim dinner to make him up for being late.




    Is "him" in the above optional or must I delete it? Thanks.
    No, it's not optional. It doesn't belong there at all. The phrasal verb 'make up for' takes only one object - the indirect object (the thing made up for).

    b

  3. #3
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    Default Re: I bought Kim dinner to make him up for being late.

    Thanks, Bob.
    I take your point.
    But in our mother tongue, we have a similar expression and we usually put in the person to whom we want to make up for something. So I wonder if the following sound right to you?


    I want to make up for being late to Jim.
    I'd like to make up to you for misunderstanding you.
    I'd like to make it up to you for misunderstanding you.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: I bought Kim dinner to make him up for being late.

    Fine, all those cases with 'to <object>' are fine. Your original sentence had 'made him up'*; so when I said 'one object' I was wrong; you can use two objects, but both are indirect - one for and one to.



    b
    PS
    *The most obvious interpretation of 'made him up' is 'applied make-up [cosmetics] to him'.

  5. #5
    angliholic's Avatar
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    Default Re: I bought Kim dinner to make him up for being late.

    Thanks, Bob.
    Got it.

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