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  1. #1
    Silver Boat is offline Newbie
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    Default Does "wagon" equal to "car"?

    My student asked me: What does "wagon" mean?
    I consulted the dictionary and found that "wagon" had two meanings. One is that "four-wheeled vehicle for carrying goods, pulled by horses, oxen", and the other is "open railway truck, for example for coal". Then my student asked me : Does "wagon" have the meaning of "car"? According to the two meanings in the dictionary, I told him "no". Then my studnet found a car named "9-3 SPORTWAGON" on the internet and he told me that "wagon" must have the meaning of "car".
    I am confused. Does "wagon" equal to "car"?

  2. #2
    2006 is online now Key Member
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    Default Re: Does "wagon" equal to "car"?

    1...Say, 'Is "wagon" equal to "car"?' or 'Does "wagon" equal "car"?'

    2...No, the two words do not mean the same thing.
    Years ago, one commonly saw a kind of car called a "station wagon". It was a long car that could seat more people than a usual car and/or could carry more suitcases, boxes, etc than a usual car could. Station wagons have now been largely replaced by SUVs.

  3. #3
    Silver Boat is offline Newbie
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    Smile Re: Does "wagon" equal to "car"?

    Quote Originally Posted by 2006 View Post
    1...Say, 'Is "wagon" equal to "car"?' or 'Does "wagon" equal "car"?'

    2...No, the two words do not mean the same thing.
    Years ago, one commonly saw a kind of car called a "station wagon". It was a long car that could seat more people than a usual car and/or could carry more suitcases, boxes, etc than a usual car could. Station wagons have now been largely replaced by SUVs.
    Thank you so much. I wrote it so hurriedly that I forgot "equal" is an adj here. So: Is "wagon" equal to "car"? Or: Does "wagon" equal "car"? ("equal" is used as a verb) Am I right?

    Then why does the car "9-3 SPORTWAGON" have the name which includes the word "wagon"?
    And would you please tell me what is SUVs?
    Last edited by Silver Boat; 18-Dec-2007 at 06:49. Reason: Want to add more questions

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    2006 is online now Key Member
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    Default Re: Does "wagon" equal to "car"?

    [quote=Silver Boat;237763] Is "wagon" equal to "car"? Or: Does "wagon" equal "car"? ("equal" is used as a verb) Am I right? Yes.

    Then why does the car "9-3 SPORTWAGON" have the name which includes the word "wagon"?
    1...A name can be anything it wants to be.
    2...That most likely relates to its ability to function lilke the station wagons did, to carry a lot of people or stuff.
    And would you please tell me what is SUVs?
    SUV is short for Sport Utility Vehicle, a van that can carry a lot of stuff and can pull a boat or mobile home. [ /quote]
    2006

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    Ouisch is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: Does "wagon" equal to "car"?

    from Mental Floss magazine:

    Several independent manufacturers purchased Model T chassis (for about $700) and then added a wooden wagon-style body to them. These vehicles were called “depot hacks” and were used by taxi drivers (”hacks”) to pick up passengers and cargo at train stations (”depots”). In those days, virtually all long-distance travel was done by train, and there was a great demand for vehicles that could transport passengers and large amounts of luggage comfortably from station to home.

    Over time, when “depots” became known as “stations” and the “wagon” vehicles were used by regular folk and not just “hacks,” the term “depot hack” evolved into “station wagon.”

    The Star Motor Company released the first production station wagons in 1923. Six years later, Ford jumped on the bandwagon and introduced the Model A, making it the first popularly-priced station wagon. Chrysler’s 1941 Town & Country was the first station wagon to stray away from the traditional boxy design, producing a wagon that more closely resembled a sedan.

    Although several of today’s vehicles resemble station wagons (the Chrysler Pacifica comes to mind), the true “station wagon era” more-or-less ended in the United States 1996 when Buick ceased production of its 18-foot-long luxury Roadmaster model. It was, at the least, the last car unashamed to refer to itself by the term “station wagon.”

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