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  1. #1
    Bandit Guest

    Default Please help examples of strong and weak sounds in verbs

    what does it mean by strong and weak sounds in verbs?

    can i have some examples??

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Please help examples of strong and weak sounds in verbs

    Quote Originally Posted by Bandit
    what does it mean by strong and weak sounds in verbs?

    can i have some examples??
    There are two answers to that question.

    1. Morphology
    2. Meaning

    Quote Originally Posted by Morphology
    Jacob Grimm (1785–1863), one of the two fairy-tale–collecting brothers from Germany who were also famous grammarians, chose the names strong verbs and weak verbs for the two dominant patterns of verbs in the Germanic languages. Those he called strong made their past tenses and past participles mainly by changing medial vowels, as do English begin, began, begun and drive, drove, driven. His weak verbs made their tense changes by adding various forms of the dental suffix, as in English study, studied, studied and bake, baked, baked.
    Read More. Click Here for the SOURCE

    Quote Originally Posted by Meaning
    Verbs have a natural hierarchy, from strongest to weakest:

    Doing (strongest)
    Saying
    Thinking or feeling
    Being done to
    Being (weakest)

    This example should illustrate the hierarchy of verbs in reverse order (from weakest to strongest):

    Jim was sick.
    Jim was being made sick by the clam dip.
    Jim felt sick.
    "I feel sick," Jim said.
    Jim vomited on the Persian rug.

    The strongest verbs express actions in the real world. The weaker verbs express less real-world action. At the bottom are the being verbs which express either no action or very little.
    SOURCE

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