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  1. #1
    refiner's Avatar
    refiner is offline Newbie
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    Please explain the incorrect answers in the questions below.

    Q3. I am going there ____ the language
    for learning - InCorrect, Why not
    to learn - Correct

    Q5. It'll take us a long time ____ a decision.
    for making - InCorrect, Why not
    to make - Correct

    Q9 - I haven't got enough money ____ it.
    for buying - InCorrect, Why not
    to buy - Correct

  2. #2
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    Re: Please explain the incorrect answers in the questions below.

    TO: signifies orientation toward a goal. When the goal is physical, such as a destination, "to" implies movement in the direction of the goal. Example: Mary returned to her apartment.


    When the goal is not a physical place, for instance, an action, "to" marks a verb; it is attached as an infinitive and expresses purpose. The preposition may occur alone or in the phrase in order. Example: I am going there to learn the language.



    We use for when we measure time (seconds, minutes, hours, days, months, years).
    He held his breath for seven minutes.
    She's lived there for seven years.
    The British and Irish have been quarreling for seven centuries.

  3. #3
    belly_ttt is offline Senior Member
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    Re: Please explain the incorrect answers in the questions below.

    Hi Carl, how about this sentence:
    I'm leaving Viet Nam to Japan for a job

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    Re: Please explain the incorrect answers in the questions below.

    OK Belly you got me... I was trying to be too simple with my explanation

    Here are the uses of for that Webster knows:

    "1 a—used as a function word to indicate purpose <a grant for studying medicine> b—used as a function word to indicate an intended goal <left for home><acted for the best> c—used as a function word to indicate the object or recipient of a perception, desire, or activity <now for a good rest><run for your life><an eye for a bargain>2 a: as being or constituting <taken for a fool> <eggs for breakfast> b—used as a function word to indicate an actual or implied enumeration or selection <for one thing, the price is too high>3: because of <can't sleep for the heat>4—used as a function word to indicate suitability or fitness <it is not for you to choose><ready for action>5 a: in place of <go to the store for me> b (1): on behalf of : representing <speaks for the court> (2): in favor of <all for the plan>6: in spite of —usually used with all<for all his large size, he moves gracefully>7: with respect to : concerning <a stickler for detail> <heavy for its size>8 a—used as a function word to indicate equivalence in exchange <$10 for a hat>, equality in number or quantity <point for point>, or correspondence or correlation <for every one that works, you'll find five that don't> b—used as a function word to indicate number of attempts <0 for 4>9—used as a function word to indicate duration of time or extent of space <gone for two days>10: in honor of : after <named for her grandmother>"

  5. #5
    belly_ttt is offline Senior Member
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    Re: Please explain the incorrect answers in the questions below.

    Oh, oh, I didn't mean to... what you say... "get you"
    What I'm asking here is,
    IN you previous post, you said that to indicates towards a goal whilst for also implies a purpose. I think there's no differences between goal and purpose so why can't we use for in a sentence like: I'm going to Japan for learning their language but I'm going to Japan to learn their language?

  6. #6
    refiner's Avatar
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    Re: Please explain the incorrect answers in the questions below.

    Hi_there_carl,

    Thanks for your detailed explanation, can you please provide similar rules for using "to"?

  7. #7
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    Re: Please explain the incorrect answers in the questions below.

    Refiner,
    You can read about all the uses of the preposition "to" here: to - Definition from the Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary

    Belly,
    As far as I know we do not use "for" to mark a verb. So "I'm going to Japan for learning their language" is just wrong.

  8. #8
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    Re: Please explain the incorrect answers in the questions below.

    Simply put, a noun always follow for, and though learning may be a noun ("Playing too much games may impact his learning"), the sentences calls for a verb (action) and not a noun (object).

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