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  1. #1
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    Default Weak And Strong Syllables

    Can Yu Please Give Me Some Differencies B/w Weak And Strong Syllables

  2. #2
    heidita's Avatar
    heidita is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Weak And Strong Syllables

    In short: a weak syllable is an unstressed one, a strong syllable, the stressed syllable.

    Impolite.

    im= strong syllable

    po= weak

    lite= weak

  3. #3
    Buddhaheart is offline Member
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    Default Re: Weak And Strong Syllables

    In phonology, a heavy or strong syllable is considered to be with a branching rhyme, i.e. one that has a long vowel or diphthong nucleus or a vowel followed by a coda. The typical patterns are VV, CVV, CV+C, CVCC, CVVCC & CVVC. On the other hand, a weak or light syllable is one with no branching rhyme, i.e. one that has a short vowel with or without a consonant following. The typical patterns are V, CV & CVC. For example, ‘rain’ (/rewn/) and ‘see’ (/si+/) are heavy syllable; the 1st syllable of ‘reduce’ (/rw.0dju+s/) and the 2nd syllable of ‘father’ (/0fY+.šcr/) are weak ones.

    As heidita indicated, a heavy syllable is usually the one that gets stressed in a multi-syllable word, never a weak one. Some heavy syllable is unstressed in a multi-syllable word. For example, in ‘dialect’, the 3rd syllable is not stressed.

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    Default Re: Weak And Strong Syllables

    Actually, in "impolite":

    im = secondary stress (so, I don't know if weak or strong)
    po = weak syllable
    lite = primary stress --> STRONG syllable

    (I don't mean, by my correction, to be impolite or anything )

  5. #5
    heidita's Avatar
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    Default Re: Weak And Strong Syllables

    Hi pon, welcome to the forum:)

    I am wondering....I have always pronounced and heard the word pronounced with the primary stress on the first sillable.

    However, I have found this on the Mirriam webster:

    \ˌim-pə-ˈlīt\ Or this on the oxford: impolite /'ɪmpə'laɪt/

    Interesting as the dictionaries do not agree on the stress.

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