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  1. #1
    imchongjun is offline Member
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    Default logical connection between the conditional clause and the conclution

    Hi, teachers.
    Would you help me understand the next sentence from "The Nebuly Coat" (1903)?

    (Lord Blandamer often visits Miss Joliffe's huble lodging house to talk with young Mr Westray about the restoration work in the minster. People in the town say that the lord visits the lodging house to see the landlady's young niece. Hearing this, Miss Joliffe retorts)
    Not but what Lord Blandamer has called upon me too, apart from Mr Westray. And what have you to say to _that_? If his lordship has thought fit to honour me by drinking a cup of tea under my roof, there are many in Cullerne would have been glad to get out their best china if he had only asked himself to _their_ houses.

    I have difficulty understanding the logical connection between the condition and the conclusion of the last sentence. The condition says "if the lordship thought fit to honor me...", but how does this lead to the conclution that many people would offer the lordship warmest hospitality? It seems to me there is a gap in the logic. I appreciate any comments and suggestions. Thank you.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: logical connection between the conditional clause and the conclution

    The 'logic' starts in the background context you gave: Lord Blandamer often visits Miss Joliffe...to talk..about the restoration work. However, people in the town say that the lord visits to see the landlady's young niece. That is, there may be some 'impropriety' going on, some scandal which would blacken Lord Blandamer's character and reputation. In Victorian society, such people would not be received(=not invited to call, or welcomed into the homes of decent people if they did arrive.)
    Miss Joliffe responds to the gossip: Lord B not only calls upon her niece, but also herself. She feels it an honour that Lord B calls and has afternoon tea with them... and rather than shunning him, the gossipy people in town would jump at the opportunity to entertain him - just let him drop in, and out would come the best cups and saucers (used only on very special occasions) they would feel so honoured at having him call on them. In other words, Miss Joliffe is hinting that the gossip is based on pure envy, that he honours Miss Joliffe's home and not theirs.

  3. #3
    imchongjun is offline Member
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    Default Re: logical connection between the conditional clause and the conclution

    Now I see.
    Thank you, David L. Your response is very vlear.

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