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Thread: Nor/Neither?

  1. #1
    Simosito's Avatar
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    Default Nor/Neither?

    Ok, I can't understand the difference between NOR and NEITHER.
    So, I have 3 questions:

    1) Is correct to say:
    >>I don't have any skis
    >>Neither I do
    2) When NOR is used and when it isn't?

    (In A. Horowitz' books I've always found "Nor do I")

    3) Is NOR like "and neither"?



    (I hope this is the correct section)

    Thanks.

    --Simosito

  2. #2
    Anglika is offline No Longer With Us
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    Default Re: Nor/Neither?

    It is usually "neither...nor".

    We can neither change it nor improve it.

    As to using either on their own, in BrE both are used and mean the same:

    neither do I // nor do I are both acceptable.

  3. #3
    Simosito's Avatar
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    Default Re: Nor/Neither?

    well, thank you!

  4. #4
    be real is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: Nor/Neither?

    neither & nor are the same
    and for the first Q

    you should say : neither do I or nor do I
    not : neitherI do

    hope you have benefit from that

  5. #5
    JJM Ballantyne is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: Nor/Neither?

    The confusion arises here because in neither do I/nor do I both neither and nor are conjunctions and essentially synonymous.

    However, while nor can only be a conjunction, neither is also capable of functioning as an adjective or a pronoun:

    neither person had the correct answer
    (adjective)

    neither had the correct answer (pronoun)

    In the expression neither... nor..., neither acts either as an adjective or a pronoun depending on the context. However, nor remains a conjunction throughout.

    neither Jeff nor his sister were there

    neither of them had a car nor saw any point in owning one

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    Simosito's Avatar
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    Default Re: Nor/Neither?

    One more question:

    IS

    Neither me nor my mum kill anyone

    Or

    Neither me nor my mum kills anyone
    ?

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    Simosito's Avatar
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    Default Re: Nor/Neither?

    up?

  8. #8
    seba_870701 is offline Member
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    Default Re: Nor/Neither?

    Quote Originally Posted by Simosito View Post
    One more question:

    IS

    Neither me nor my mum kill anyone

    Or

    Neither me nor my mum kills anyone
    ?
    The latter one is correct.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Nor/Neither?

    Quote Originally Posted by seba_870701 View Post
    The latter one is correct.
    Both are fine and correct as long as the construction neither ... nor ... is used with two singular nouns or pronouns. Using a plural verb is more informal.

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    Default Re: Nor/Neither?

    Here's some more information on the issue.

    If there are two singular nouns, it's all right to say:

    Neither my sister nor my brother likes / like pizza.
    Neither Susan nor Mark likes / like pizza
    .
    (plural form of verb is informal)

    Even if the nouns are in two different forms, it's also all right to say:

    Neither my friends nor my sister likes / like going to parties.

    However, try to put a plural noun after nor and use a plural verb form:

    Neither my sister nor my friends like going to parties.

    If there are only plural nouns, use a plural form of the verb only:

    Neither my siblings nor my friends drink lemonade.

    And what if there are only pronouns used?
    Here's the answer:

    Neither she nor he was keen on judo.
    Neither she nor you know me.
    Neither you nor I am responsible for the failure
    .

    The rule says - the pronoun that is closest to the verb determines the use of the form of the verb; and try to put I as the second element of the construction - it makes the sentence more readable and more polite.

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