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    #1

    You sound as if, it sounds as if

    This sentence comes from Raymond Murphy's ENGLISH GRAMMAR IN USE:

    Sue and Dave have just been telling you about all the interesting things they did while they were on holiday. You say: (It sounds as if you had a good time.)

    MY QUESTION IS: Coud we say 'You sound as if you had a good time'?

    Thank you very much.

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    #2

    Wink Re: You sound as if, it sounds as if

    Either is OK. The meaning is: 'The tone of your letter suggests you had a good time.'

    'Sounds' to replace 'seems' is commonplace but, strictly speaking, someone can only sound happy if the make some sort of noise!

    'Vegetable soup sounds good.' But can you hear it?

    Dave

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    #3

    Re: You sound as if, it sounds as if

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Mortimer View Post
    Either is OK. The meaning is: 'The tone of your letter suggests you had a good time.'

    'Sounds' to replace 'seems' is commonplace but, strictly speaking, someone can only sound happy if the make some sort of noise!

    'Vegetable soup sounds good.' But can you hear it?

    Dave

    Dear Dave Mortimer,
    Thank you for your kindness. But I'm still a bit confused. I didn't refer to any 'letter', nor would I like to replace 'sound' with 'seem'. The sentence given is used to reply to the other party's speech rather than what is written in a letter.

    Yours truly,
    joham


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    #4

    Re: You sound as if, it sounds as if

    Quote Originally Posted by joham View Post
    This sentence comes from Raymond Murphy's ENGLISH GRAMMAR IN USE:

    Sue and Dave have just been telling you about all the interesting things they did while they were on holiday. You say: (It sounds as if you had a good time.)

    MY QUESTION IS: Coud we say 'You sound as if you had a good time'?

    Thank you very much.
    You could say this - particularly if Sue and Dave have been VERY excited in their account.

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