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  1. #1
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    When to use "bring" and "take"

    My husband and i are having a dispute. Would you please explain how and when to use "bring" vs "take?"

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    Soup's Avatar
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    Re: When to use "bring" and "take"

    From bring 3, take. The Columbia Guide to Standard American English. 1993

    Bring implies movement toward the speaker, take, movement away from the speaker, so long as these directions are clear: Please bring me my coat. Will you take some cookies to your sister? Where the directions are unspecified, unimportant, or equivocal, the words are frequently interchangeable: Let’s bring [take] our raincoats with us to the game. He took [brought] her to a movie, and after they’d had something to eat, he brought [took] her home again. All these are Standard, although purists are usually quick to attack when they feel they see clear movement toward or away that is not reflected in your choice.

    Other sources
    "Bring" and "Take"
    Learning English | BBC World Service
    http://www.usingenglish.com/files/pdf/bring-take.pdf

  3. #3
    louhevly is offline Member
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    Re: When to use "bring" and "take"

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
    My husband and i are having a dispute. Would you please explain how and when to use "bring" vs "take?"
    For me, "bring" if the action is "coming" and "take" if the action is "going".

    He's [coming here and] bringing me the wine.
    He's [going there and] taking them the wine.
    I'm [coming to your house and] bringing you the wine.
    They're [coming to your house and] bringing you the wine.

    Lou

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    groovyshoozyq is offline Newbie
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    Re: When to use "bring" and "take"

    Thank you! I will "take" these words to my husband!

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    louhevly is offline Member
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    Re: When to use "bring" and "take"

    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    From bring 3, take. The Columbia Guide to Standard American English. 1993
    [INDENT]
    Bring implies movement toward the speaker, take, movement away from the speaker, so long as these directions are clear: Please bring me my coat. Will you take some cookies to your sister?
    The problem with this definition is that, for me, when I tell you I'm coming to your house, the implication is movement away from the speaker (me), but I'd never use "take" in this case. For me it has to be "bring".

    "I'll come by this afternoon and bring you the papers."

    «I'll come by this afternoon and take you the papers» is, for me, impossible.

    Perhaps this is different in BrE.

    Lou

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    Re: When to use "bring" and "take"

    Quote Originally Posted by louhevly View Post
    The problem with this definition is that, for me, when I tell you I'm coming to your house, the implication is movement away from the speaker (me), but I'd never use "take" in this case. For me it has to be "bring".
    Lou, unlike me, and CGSAE 1993, you seem to have a great sense of direction.

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