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Thread: Question!

  1. #1
    moonwalker Guest

    Default Question!

    =============================================
    If you cannot accept orders, you must _______ us when placing order and request that all goods be held until everything is ready.

    (A) remind (B) inform (C) notify (D) tell
    ==============================================


    I think the answer is both B and C.

    Somebody (who is Korean) says "inform" is more natural and common
    in this situation.

    Is it true?


    Please, explain it to me clearly!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
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    Default Re: Question!

    Quote Originally Posted by moonwalker
    =============================================
    If you cannot accept orders, you must _______ us when placing order and request that all goods be held until everything is ready.

    (A) remind (B) inform (C) notify (D) tell
    ==============================================


    I think the answer is both B and C.

    Somebody (who is Korean) says "inform" is more natural and common
    in this situation.

    Is it true?


    Please, explain it to me clearly!
    The choice is between (B) 'inform' and (D) 'tell'. inform is business English.

    As for (C) 'notify', when you contact them you are already notifying them, so (C) is out. Note, You must tell us/inform us about this: that you cannot accept orders.

    All the best, :D

  3. #3
    moonwalker Guest

    Default Re: Question!

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    Quote Originally Posted by moonwalker
    =============================================
    If you cannot accept orders, you must _______ us when placing order and request that all goods be held until everything is ready.

    (A) remind (B) inform (C) notify (D) tell
    ==============================================


    I think the answer is both B and C.

    Somebody (who is Korean) says "inform" is more natural and common
    in this situation.

    Is it true?


    Please, explain it to me clearly!
    The choice is between (B) 'inform' and (D) 'tell'. inform is business English.

    As for (C) 'notify', when you contact them you are already notifying them, so (C) is out. Note, You must tell us/inform us about this: that you cannot accept orders.

    All the best, :D


    Hi. Casiopea. :D
    You always kindly answer my questions.
    Thank you a lot.

    Like you said above, "tell" is also good.
    Why didn't I think about it?


    I'd like to ask you more about "notify" and " inform".

    =================================
    notify : to tell someone officially about something

    inform : to tell someone about particular facts:
    =================================

    according to Cambridge advanced learners' dictionary,
    It is hard to distinguish the meaning between two words except the word "officially".

    Isn't the word "notify" is almost the same as the word " inform" ?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    12,970
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Question!

    If you cannot accept orders, you must inform us when placing order and request that all goods be held until everything is ready.

    I'd like to ask you more about "notify" and " inform".

    =================================
    notify : to tell someone officially about something

    inform : to tell someone about particular facts:
    =================================

    according to Cambridge advanced learners' dictionary,
    It is hard to distinguish the meaning between two words except the word "officially".

    Isn't the word "notify" is almost the same as the word " inform" ?
    Yes. That's right. They're often used in a way that makes then appear as if they are synonyms; but they're not. The difference in usage depends on whether the speaker considers X a particular fact or an official reason:

    inform us about a particular fact (i.e. If you cannot accept orders, please inform us about that fact.)

    notify us about closing your account (i.e. If you are going to close your account with us, then notify us, officially.)

    All the best, :D

  5. #5
    moonwalker Guest

    Default Re: Question!

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    If you cannot accept orders, you must inform us when placing order and request that all goods be held until everything is ready.

    I'd like to ask you more about "notify" and " inform".

    =================================
    notify : to tell someone officially about something

    inform : to tell someone about particular facts:
    =================================

    according to Cambridge advanced learners' dictionary,
    It is hard to distinguish the meaning between two words except the word "officially".

    Isn't the word "notify" is almost the same as the word " inform" ?
    Yes. That's right. They're often used in a way that makes then appear as if they are synonyms; but they're not. The difference in usage depends on whether the speaker considers X a particular fact or an official reason:

    inform us about a particular fact (i.e. If you cannot accept orders, please inform us about that fact.)

    notify us about closing your account (i.e. If you are going to close your account with us, then notify us, officially.)

    All the best, :D


    Now, I see. :D

    Then, how about "tell" and " inform"?
    If you were a student, and your teacher gave you the question above,
    which one would you choose between them?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    12,970
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Question!

    Quote Originally Posted by moonwalker
    Now, I see. :D

    Then, how about "tell" and " inform"?
    If you were a student, and your teacher gave you the question above,
    which one would you choose between them?
    I'd choose inform if the context made reference to business.

    EX: Inform us of your decision.
    EX: Tell us what you're going to do.

    :D

  7. #7
    moonwalker Guest

    Default Re: Question!

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    Quote Originally Posted by moonwalker
    Now, I see. :D

    Then, how about "tell" and " inform"?
    If you were a student, and your teacher gave you the question above,
    which one would you choose between them?
    I'd choose inform if the context made reference to business.

    EX: Inform us of your decision.
    EX: Tell us what you're going to do.

    :D

    Everything is so clear.
    Thank you, Casiopea. :D

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