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Thread: Homonym

  1. #1
    elessar8587 Guest

    Default Homonym

    What is a Homomym
    explain with some examples

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    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default

    There are two subdivisions of homonym:
    Homophone- words that sound the same, although they are spelt differently: rein, rain & reign
    Homograph- words that are spelt the same, although they are different words- wind (moving air) and wind (a clock) look the same, but are pronounced differently.

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    Default Re: Homonym

    Quote Originally Posted by elessar8587
    What is a Homomym
    explain with some examples
    There is a lot of confusion about the word "homonym".

    In my opinion, there are three divisions of "homonym":

    1. homophones: words spelled differently but pronounced the same way
    a. to/two/too
    b. lead (mineral)/led
    c. read (past tense)/red

    2. homographs: words spelled the same way, but pronounced differently
    a. lead (verb)/lead (mineral)
    b. bow (archery)/bow (ship)
    c. wind (weather)/wind (watch)

    3. homonyms/true homonyms/homomorphs: words spelled the same way and pronounced the same way, but that have different meanings and possibly origins.
    a. bear (animal)/bear (verb)
    b. bank (money)/bank (river)/bank (billiards)
    c. swallow (bird)/swallow (ingest)

    Some people would include different uses of the same word as homonyms: take (verb) and take (noun). I see no reason to include those. It is not unusual in English for a word to be a noun or a verb.

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