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Thread: help

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
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    help

    Biochemistry, Chemistry, Biology, Integrative Biology, and Molecular/Cellular Biology...

    What does the slash between molecular and cellular mean?
    Doesn't it mean "or?"
    However, I can't find "molecular or cellular biology" in my school's majors list , but I can only find "molecular and cellular biology."

    Besides, please take a look at this:
    Chemical Engineering, Physics, Math/Computer Science [combined program], and Statistics/Computer Science [combined program]...

    What does "combined program" mean? Does it mean "math and computer science" and " statistics and computer?" Or it has nothing to do with "and?"

    I know my question is quite confusing. :( Hopefully, you guys get it.

    Thanks a million!
    :o

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
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    Re: help

    Quote Originally Posted by bread
    Biochemistry, Chemistry, Biology, Integrative Biology, and Molecular/Cellular Biology...

    What does the slash between molecular and cellular mean?
    Doesn't it mean "or?"
    However, I can't find "molecular or cellular biology" in my school's majors list , but I can only find "molecular and cellular biology."

    Besides, please take a look at this:
    Chemical Engineering, Physics, Math/Computer Science [combined program], and Statistics/Computer Science [combined program]...

    What does "combined program" mean? Does it mean "math and computer science" and " statistics and computer?" Or it has nothing to do with "and?"

    I know my question is quite confusing. :( Hopefully, you guys get it.

    Thanks a million!
    :o
    The technical term is for the punctuation mark / is solidus; In Britain it's known as an oblique , and in North America it's called a slash. Other terms it's known by are as follows: a diagonal, separatrix, shilling mark, stroke, virgule, or slant.

    Note the word "separatrix" becuase it sheds some light on the function of/. It's used to mark a relationship between words, something like what a hyphen does, but it differs from a hyphen in that it also separates the words in their own right, like this,

    Mr/Mrs Johnson will be coming over for dinner.
    ==> Mr and Mrs Johnson, both. That is, together they will be coming, yet their names are separate in their own right.

    All the best, :D

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