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Thread: In or out?

  1. moonwalker
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    #1

    In or out?

    =============================================
    Please take a few minutes to fill ___________ our No Risk and No Obligation Debt Cousultation & Analysis Form and submit by the end of this week.

    a. out b.into c.in d.off
    ==============================================

    fill in the form or fill out the form?

    I think both are right. Right?

    It is confusing.

    I need your help.


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
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    #2
    You are right on it. :wink:

  2. ggomad
    Guest
    #3
    Hi, Blacknomi,

    Is it used in the way that we--
    fill in the blank(s) and fill out the form(s)?

    As far as I can remeber, fill in means to insert words in the blank, whereas fill out means to complete the form.

    Please correct me if I'm wrong.


    • Join Date: Jun 2004
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    #4
    You're right AFAIK.

    FRC


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
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    #5
    Quote Originally Posted by ggomad
    Please correct me if I'm wrong.
    N/A

    :D

  3. moonwalker
    Guest
    #6

    Re: In or out?

    Thank you all for replying to my questions. :)

    I have looked up the phrase in a dictionary.


    fill in : phrasal verb
    [transitive] to add information such as your name or address in the empty spaces on an official document: FILL OUT:
    Please fill in your name and address in the space provided.
    I spent over two hours filling in the application form.
    Fill in the missing words.


    fillout : phrasal verb
    [transitive] to add information such as your name or address in the empty spaces on an official document: FILL IN:
    It took a long time to fill out the application form.

    Macmillan Publishers Ltd. 2002


    I think both fill out a form" and "fill in a form" are right.


    I believe the question above has two answers.


    Have a nice day! :D

  4. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
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    #7

    Re: In or out?

    Quote Originally Posted by moonwalker
    Thank you all for replying to my questions. :)

    I have looked up the phrase in a dictionary.


    fill in : phrasal verb
    [transitive] to add information such as your name or address in the empty spaces on an official document: FILL OUT:
    Please fill in your name and address in the space provided.
    I spent over two hours filling in the application form.
    Fill in the missing words.


    fillout : phrasal verb
    [transitive] to add information such as your name or address in the empty spaces on an official document: FILL IN:
    It took a long time to fill out the application form.

    Macmillan Publishers Ltd. 2002


    I think both fill out a form" and "fill in a form" are right.


    I believe the question above has two answers.


    Have a nice day! :D
    I agree with ggomad. :D In addition, Fill in means, to add X to Y, whereas fill out means, to complete Y by adding in X.

    Fill in (the blanks) on the form; fill out (i.e. complete) the form.

    EX: Please fill in your name and address in the space provided.
    EX: I spent over two hours filling in the (blanks on the) application form.
    EX: Fill in the missing words in the blanks.
    EX: She is filling him in (i.e. Idiom: She's giving him information; she's adding in what he doesn't know).

    EX: It took a long time to fill out (i.e. complete) the application form.
    EX: She fills out a sweater well. (i.e. Idiom: She completes the sweater's shape)

    All the best, :D

  5. moonwalker
    Guest
    #8

    Re: In or out?

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    Quote Originally Posted by moonwalker
    Thank you all for replying to my questions. :)

    I have looked up the phrase in a dictionary.


    fill in : phrasal verb
    [transitive] to add information such as your name or address in the empty spaces on an official document: FILL OUT:
    Please fill in your name and address in the space provided.
    I spent over two hours filling in the application form.
    Fill in the missing words.


    fillout : phrasal verb
    [transitive] to add information such as your name or address in the empty spaces on an official document: FILL IN:
    It took a long time to fill out the application form.

    Macmillan Publishers Ltd. 2002


    I think both fill out a form" and "fill in a form" are right.


    I believe the question above has two answers.


    Have a nice day! :D
    I agree with ggomad. :D In addition, Fill in means, to add X to Y, whereas fill out means, to complete Y by adding in X.

    Fill in (the blanks) on the form; fill out (i.e. complete) the form.

    EX: Please fill in your name and address in the space provided.
    EX: I spent over two hours filling in the (blanks on the) application form.
    EX: Fill in the missing words in the blanks.
    EX: She is filling him in (i.e. Idiom: She's giving him information; she's adding in what he doesn't know).

    EX: It took a long time to fill out (i.e. complete) the application form.
    EX: She fills out a sweater well. (i.e. Idiom: She completes the sweater's shape)

    All the best, :D



    I know what your point is.

    But take a look at the following citation.
    =================================
    fill sth in/out (WRITE) phrasal verb [M]
    to write the necessary information on an official document:
    to fill in a form/questionnaire

    http://dictionary.cambridge.org/
    ==================================

    That is cited from Cambridge advanced learners' dictionary.

    I know the expression " fill in the blanks."

    But I think the phrasal verb "fill in" can have various objects,
    as you can see, such as blanks, names and addresses, a form, etc.

    If "fill in a form" is not acceptable or appropriate,
    why the well-known English dictionary says it's ok.

    It's weird.

  6. ggomad
    Guest
    #9
    I'd say no one dictionary is perfect in all its articles.

    I also suspect that this confusion may be more prevalent in British English.

    American Heritage Dic. is another good source in learning the usage of English, if I might add. Its link is,

    http://www.bartleby.com/61/95/F0119500.html

    Bye for now.~~

  7. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
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    #10
    Quote Originally Posted by ggomad
    I'd say no one dictionary is perfect in all its articles.

    I also suspect that this confusion may be more prevalent in British English.

    American Heritage Dic. is another good source in learning the usage of English, if I might add. Its link is,

    http://www.bartleby.com/61/95/F0119500.html

    Bye for now.~~
    To add a word, phrase into a blank is to complete that particular sentence/line. To do that for the entire form is to complete the entire form. The difference here is between completing a line and completing a form. Fill in ~ Fill out are used synonymously by speakers--but not by all speakers) because they share a semantic similarity, notably 'complete': Fill out means to complete the entire form/shape, whereas fill in means to complete the sentences/lines, the result of which produces a filled out form, a completed form.

    Trust your instincts! That is, asking questions is a good thing. :D

    All the best,

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