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Thread: In or out?

  1. #11
    moonwalker Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    Quote Originally Posted by ggomad
    I'd say no one dictionary is perfect in all its articles.

    I also suspect that this confusion may be more prevalent in British English.

    American Heritage Dic. is another good source in learning the usage of English, if I might add. Its link is,

    http://www.bartleby.com/61/95/F0119500.html

    Bye for now.~~
    To add a word, phrase into a blank is to complete that particular sentence/line. To do that for the entire form is to complete the entire form. The difference here is between completing a line and completing a form. Fill in ~ Fill out are used synonymously by speakers--but not by all speakers) because they share a semantic similarity, notably 'complete': Fill out means to complete the entire form/shape, whereas fill in means to complete the sentences/lines, the result of which produces a filled out form, a completed form.

    Trust your instincts! That is, asking questions is a good thing. :D

    All the best,


    Now, I have found it all out.

    Casiopea. You must be from the U.S.

    According to Cambridge Advanced Learners' dictionary,
    it says that " fill in a form" and "fill out a form" are ok.

    According to Macmillan dictionary, it also says that
    "fill in a form" and " fill out a form" are ok.

    Last, Oxford Advanced Learners' dictionary says
    that "fill out a form" is common in American English.

    ===============================================
    fill in something
    (also fill sth out especially in AmE) to complete a form, etc. by writing information on it: to fill in an application form To order, fill in the coupon on p 54.
    ===============================================

    I don't usually refer to one dictionary.
    My favorites are Cambridge and Macmillan.

    And I'm gonna add one from now on, Oxford.

    Webster is also good.

    :D

  2. #12
    Red5 is offline Webmaster, UsingEnglish.com
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    Hi moonwalker,

    Have you seen http://www.onelook.com/ ? It gives you access to all the dictionaries you mentioned, and many more!

    PS - you can search onelook.com from the dictionary bar at the top of this page.
    Red5
    Webmaster, UsingEnglish.com

  3. #13
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    Indeed, Cas is good! :D

  4. #14
    moonwalker Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by Red5
    Hi moonwalker,

    Have you seen http://www.onelook.com/ ? It gives you access to all the dictionaries you mentioned, and many more!

    PS - you can search onelook.com from the dictionary bar at the top of this page.


    Wow. It's excellent! :wink:

  5. #15
    Red5 is offline Webmaster, UsingEnglish.com
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    My pleasure.
    Red5
    Webmaster, UsingEnglish.com

  6. #16
    moonwalker Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by Red5
    My pleasure.
    If I had known that there was a reference column on the left,
    I wouldn't have looked up the phrasal verb in the several dictionaries.
    :x

    =========================================
    Fill in = complete a form (UK)
    I FILLED IN the application form and posted it off.

    Fill out = complete a form (US)
    I FILLED OUT the application form and mailed it.

    http://www.usingenglish.com/referenc...l-verbs/f.html
    ==========================================

    "fill in" and "fill out" are clearly explained on your site.

    Good site! :D

  7. #17
    Red5 is offline Webmaster, UsingEnglish.com
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    Thanks.
    Red5
    Webmaster, UsingEnglish.com

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