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Thread: grammatical?

  1. light's Avatar

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    #1

    grammatical?

    hello,
    are the following sentences (underlined parts) grammatically correct? what are the more standard versions?

    "If you've been around the sport or even sport practitioners, chances are you've heard about the Blue Hole."

    "You be the judge."

  2. geneticist's Avatar

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    #2

    Re: grammatical?

    in your first sentence you have to say the chances are or likely or probably
    in the second one you must say be the judge e.g. let me be the judge of the competition

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    #3

    Re: grammatical?

    I would say that those sentences are perfectly ordinary, grammatical sentences, containing usages that are common in spoken and written English.

  3. light's Avatar

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    #4

    Re: grammatical?

    thank you for the comments but still I have some questions in mind:
    1) how come "chances are" means "you have probably heard"? So is this sentence grammatical too? " If you smoke, risks are you will get cancer." If your answer is No, then what's the difference?

    2) "You be the judge" means "You decide yourself" then. Can we also say
    "you are the judge"? Is there a difference between "you be the judge" and "your are the judge"?

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    #5

    Re: grammatical?

    Phrases like "chances are," and "you be the judge" are idioms, their meanings cannot be understood from the meanings of the individual words, and those words cannot be substituted with synonyms without losing the meaning.

    Most English speakers know that the idiom, "kick the bucket" means "to die," but if you say "kick the pail," or "strike the bucket with your foot," we would not know what you were saying.

  4. light's Avatar

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    #6

    Re: grammatical?

    thank you for your answer. so it's an idiom and no chance for "risks are" :))
    learning english would have been a piece of cake if there had been no phrasals and idioms:))

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