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  1. zhengl_2000
    Guest
    #1

    set the faucet tight?

    Did u set the faucet tight? Is this right?

    Can I say: did u turn off the water tightly?

  2. christea
    Guest
    #2
    The first example you give is written in American English. The second example is written in very precise and therefore correct English as written in the UK.


    • Join Date: May 2004
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    #3
    Quote Originally Posted by christea
    The first example you give is written in American English. The second example is written in very precise and therefore correct English as written in the UK.
    I have never heard of setting faucets tight in context with turning off water.

  3. Susie Smith
    Guest
    #4
    Quote Originally Posted by twostep
    Quote Originally Posted by christea
    The first example you give is written in American English. The second example is written in very precise and therefore correct English as written in the UK.
    I have never heard of setting faucets tight in context with turning off water.
    Neither have I. :wink:

  4. zhengl_2000
    Guest
    #5

    I heard it from my apartment manager, California

    Quote Originally Posted by Susie Smith
    Quote Originally Posted by twostep
    Quote Originally Posted by christea
    The first example you give is written in American English. The second example is written in very precise and therefore correct English as written in the UK.
    I have never heard of setting faucets tight in context with turning off water.
    Neither have I. :wink:
    *****************
    Are you two American?
    If yes, it is weird.
    If not, you really need to keep learning English.
    I asked this question because American used it.

  5. Susie Smith
    Guest
    #6

    Re: I heard it from my apartment manager, California

    Quote Originally Posted by zhengl_2000
    Quote Originally Posted by Susie Smith
    Quote Originally Posted by twostep
    Quote Originally Posted by christea
    The first example you give is written in American English. The second example is written in very precise and therefore correct English as written in the UK.
    I have never heard of setting faucets tight in context with turning off water.
    Neither have I. :wink:
    *****************
    Are you two American?
    If yes, it is weird.
    If not, you really need to keep learning English.
    I asked this question because American used it.
    Why do you think it's weird? I'm an American and I don't think it's weird at all. :D I didn't say that it was wrong. I merely agreed with twostep. The fact that a person has heard or hasn't heard an expression doesn't make it right or wrong. It's a big country and people in different regions often have different ways of saying things. A lot of native speakers make glaring mistakes, btw.
    It was my first time to hear "set" used in that sense. I set a faucet every day. When I do that, I am adjusting or regulating the flow or temperature of the water. I don't use "set" in the sense of "turn off", but some people might.
    Yes, I will keep on learning English. I always loved my English classes when I was a girl and I still enjoy studying this language, but of one thing I'm certain, I will never learn enough.

  6. zhengl_2000
    Guest
    #7

    your answer

    Quote Originally Posted by Susie Smith
    Quote Originally Posted by zhengl_2000
    Quote Originally Posted by Susie Smith
    Quote Originally Posted by twostep
    Quote Originally Posted by christea
    The first example you give is written in American English. The second example is written in very precise and therefore correct English as written in the UK.
    I have never heard of setting faucets tight in context with turning off water.
    Neither have I. :wink:
    *****************
    Are you two American?
    If yes, it is weird.
    If not, you really need to keep learning English.
    I asked this question because American used it.
    Why do you think it's weird? I'm an American and I don't think it's weird at all. :D I didn't say that it was wrong. I merely agreed with twostep. The fact that a person has heard or hasn't heard an expression doesn't make it right or wrong. It's a big country and people in different regions often have different ways of saying things. A lot of native speakers make glaring mistakes, btw.
    It was my first time to hear "set" used in that sense. I set a faucet every day. When I do that, I am adjusting or regulating the flow or temperature of the water. I don't use "set" in the sense of "turn off", but some people might.
    Yes, I will keep on learning English. I always loved my English classes when I was a girl and I still enjoy studying this language, but of one thing I'm certain, I will never learn enough.

    Would you please give me the answer, the way you say it?
    I would appreciate it if you let me know the correct American way to say
    "turn off the faucet tightly".


    • Join Date: May 2004
    • Posts: 727
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    #8

    Re: your answer

    Quote Originally Posted by zhengl_2000
    Quote Originally Posted by Susie Smith
    Quote Originally Posted by zhengl_2000
    Quote Originally Posted by Susie Smith
    Quote Originally Posted by twostep
    Quote Originally Posted by christea
    The first example you give is written in American English. The second example is written in very precise and therefore correct English as written in the UK.
    I have never heard of setting faucets tight in context with turning off water.
    Neither have I. :wink:
    *****************
    Are you two American?
    If yes, it is weird.
    If not, you really need to keep learning English.
    I asked this question because American used it.
    Why do you think it's weird? I'm an American and I don't think it's weird at all. :D I didn't say that it was wrong. I merely agreed with twostep. The fact that a person has heard or hasn't heard an expression doesn't make it right or wrong. It's a big country and people in different regions often have different ways of saying things. A lot of native speakers make glaring mistakes, btw.
    It was my first time to hear "set" used in that sense. I set a faucet every day. When I do that, I am adjusting or regulating the flow or temperature of the water. I don't use "set" in the sense of "turn off", but some people might.
    Yes, I will keep on learning English. I always loved my English classes when I was a girl and I still enjoy studying this language, but of one thing I'm certain, I will never learn enough.

    Would you please give me the answer, the way you say it?
    I would appreciate it if you let me know the correct American way to say
    "turn off the faucet tightly".
    You can turn the water off. "turn off the faucet tightly" makes no sense. Try using common sense - there is nothing you can turn off. The faucet is set securely in the sink. What is in motion and can be manipulated is water.

    PS -

    Are you two American? I am not.
    If yes, it is weird. Why?
    If not, you really need to keep learning English. To each his own.
    I asked this question because American used it. There are apples and oranges.


    • Join Date: Jun 2004
    • Posts: 1,369
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    #9
    Looks like there's some faucet flame upcoming ;)

    FRC


    • Join Date: May 2004
    • Posts: 727
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    #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Francois
    Looks like there's some faucet flame upcoming ;)

    FRC
    I missed you! Well, in Alabama we do not have to worry about faucets. Being considered a developing country we still go to the well. :wink:

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