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Thread: wetland

  1. RonBee's Avatar
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    #11

    Re: wetland

    Quote Originally Posted by seba_870701 View Post
    Hi Ron.
    I've got a question about assimilation. Wouldn't it take place in a phrase like 'next day'? I mean assimilation of 't' with 'd' ?
    Regards,
    Seba
    They do tend to run together a bit, but the t sound is still there the way I pronounce it. However, it is possible that it might be barely there or not there at all. Example:
    He said he would see me the nex' day.
    In that case there would be no pause between the words.

    ~R


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    #12

    Re: wetland

    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee View Post
    They do tend to run together a bit, but the t sound is still there the way I pronounce it. However, it is possible that it might be barely there or not there at all. Example:
    He said he would see me the nex' day.
    In that case there would be no pause between the words.

    ~R
    Thanks, but I see you'd answered my post before I managed to reedit it I'm thousand years of training away from you in typing abilities
    Seba

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #13

    Re: wetland

    Quote Originally Posted by seba_870701 View Post
    Hi Ron.
    I've got a question about assimilation. Wouldn't it take place in a phrase like 'next day'? I mean assimilation of /t/ with /d/? Also in the example from Peter123's question ('next station'), shouldn't elision and assimilation take place? Not so much time ago, I was said by my teacher of phonetics that in such a case ('next station') /t/ from the word 'next' would disappear and remaining /s/ would assimilate with the initial /s/ from the word 'station.' In my way of thinking it would go like that: /'nekst 'steiʃn/ --> /'neks 'steiʃn/ --> /,nek'steiʃn/ --> /nək'steiʃn/ (in fast speech). What do you think about that? Comments from other member are welcomed as well.
    Regards,
    Seba
    What you say about assimilation is true in much current speech; and many speakers aren't aware it's happening. To take another example, it's quite hard to convince a native speaker that when they say 'fine' in an utterance-final position the noise they make is /faɪm/ ('assimilation' not to a following phoneme, but to a following mouth position - closed). But just because assimilation can happen, and in some cases is likely to happen, it doesn't always happen. In careful speech it may not.

    b

  3. rewboss's Avatar

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    #14

    Re: wetland

    There's a great deal of room for individual differences in pronunciation, of course. Certainly, I don't pronounce the "t" in "next day"; and exactly how I pronounce the final phoneme in "fine" depends on to what extent I am emphasising the word.

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