Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: lexical choices

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    28
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default lexical choices

    How many different lexical choices do we have to say someone has died?and how can we select a few common ones and describe the situationsin which they would be appropriate... what do you think about it

    for example is it appropriate
    To kick the bucket:to die.

  2. #2
    Anglika is offline No Longer With Us
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    19,448
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: lexical choices

    All these are euphemisms for dying:

    "Turned up his toes"
    "Breathed his last"
    "Turned his face to the wall"

  3. #3
    Buddhaheart is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    434
    Post Thanks / Like

    Wink Re: lexical choices

    How about a few more:

    Hes gone (peacefully) (forever).
    He left us
    Hes gone to see his Maker.
    Hes diseased.
    Hes passed on.
    Hes finished.
    (Be) six foot under.
    Hes said his last goodbye.
    Hes no more.
    Hes in a better place.
    Hes in heaven (or hell) now.
    He wont bother us anymore.
    Hes done (with)
    He wont be going back.
    Hes gone to a better place.
    He doesnt exist anymore.

    Please note Shalala some of the examples do not necessarily mean dead.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    28
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: lexical choices

    Thanks a lot Anglika and Buddhaheart.
    and ı found some of them ,ı hope they are true
    expire, pass away, pass on, depart this life, decease, perish, give up the ghost, kick the bucket

    and Anglika
    is it a term we usually use or is it impolite/polite,irreverent etc.
    "Turned up his toes"
    "Breathed his last"
    "Turned his face to the wall"
    Last edited by shalala; 10-Feb-2008 at 17:21.

  5. #5
    vil is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Bulgarian
      • Home Country:
      • Bulgaria
      • Current Location:
      • Bulgaria
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    5,000
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: lexical choices

    Hi shalala,

    There are another versions of me:

    die of, die from
    pass (quietly) away
    depart
    go the way of all flesh
    close o's days
    join the majority
    be gathered to o's fathers
    go over the divide
    cross the divide
    die a natural death
    die a violent death
    die a death of a hero
    die the death of a coward
    die suddenly
    die in one's boots
    drop of the hooks
    pack up
    quite the stage
    go aloft
    join the angels
    cash in one's checks
    hand in one's checks
    pass in one's checks
    gho west
    turn up one's nose to the daisies
    he is dead
    he is gone
    he is dead and gone
    starve
    be starving
    be starved to death
    be dying with hunger
    starve to death
    died of starvation
    be parched with thirst
    breath one's last
    decay
    decease
    decline
    disappear
    dwindle
    ebb
    end
    expire
    fade
    finish
    lapse
    pass away
    perish
    peter out
    sink
    stop
    subside
    suffer
    vanish
    wane
    wilt
    wither

    Regards.

    V.

  6. #6
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Japan
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    43,401
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: lexical choices

    And one seen on gravestones: fall asleep

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    28
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: lexical choices

    Thank a looott

    now ı m researching how it is used,i.e. the context,and the connotation and register,e.g. is it a term we usually use or is it impolite/polite,irreverent etc.

  8. #8
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Japan
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    43,401
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: lexical choices

    With 'fell asleep', I have seen t on gravestones, often for children that have died. Therefore, I'd say that this one is a euphemisism, presumably to reduce the pain felt by the family.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    28
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: lexical choices

    1-pop off (Informal)
    2-give up the ghost(an informal expression)
    3-decease(a legal term)
    4-depart this life(___________)
    5-bite the dust(_____________)
    6-breathe one's last(_____________)
    7-To kick the bucket(___________)
    8-turn up one's toes(___________)
    9-meetone's endmaker(____________)
    10-expire(_____________)
    11-pass away(_________)

    I found 1,2, and 3 .. what do you think about the others?how the words are used,i.e. connotation/context . e.g. is it a term we usually use or is it impolite/polite,irreverent etc.

  10. #10
    vil is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Bulgarian
      • Home Country:
      • Bulgaria
      • Current Location:
      • Bulgaria
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    5,000
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: lexical choices

    Dear Shalala,

    You have to pay bigger attention at your computer. It should be your first friend and a “right-hand man” (assistant)..

    depart this life (formal)
    to die. Here lies Henry Stanford, who departed this life January 13th 1867.

    bite the dust (idiom) Suffer defeat or death, as in The 1990 election saw both of our senators bite the dust. Although this expression was popularized by American Western films of the 1930s, in which either cowboys or Indians were thrown from their horses to the dusty ground, it originated much earlier. Tobias Smollett had it in Gil Blas (1750): "We made two of them bite the dust."

    breath one’s last (idiom) Die, as in Aunt Agatha breathed her last on Tuesday. This term was used by Shakespeare in 3 Henry VI (5:2): "Montague has breathed his last." It has survived but today is considered a poetic euphemism.

    kick the bucket (idiom) Die, as in All of my goldfish kicked the bucket while we were on vacation. This moderately impolite usage has a disputed origin. Some say it refers to committing suicide by hanging, in which one stands on a bucket, fastens a rope around one's neck, and kicks the bucket away. A more likely origin is the use of bucket in the sense of "a beam from which something may be suspended" because pigs were suspended by their heels from such beams after being slaughtered, the term kick the bucket came to mean "to die." [Colloquial; late 1700s]

    turn up one’s toe (idiom) Die, as in He turned up his toes last week. This expression alludes to the position of the toes when one lies flat on one's back without moving. It may be obsolescent. [Mid-1800s]
    meet your maker (humorous)
    to die. I'm afraid Zoe's rabbit is no more. He's gone to meet his maker.

    expire (verb) to breathe one's last breath; die: The patient expired early this morning.

    Pass away (idiom) Also, pass on or over. Die, as in He passed away last week, or After Grandma passes on we'll sell the land, or I hear he's about to pass over. All these terms are euphemisms for dying, although the verb pass alone as well as pass away have been used in the sense of "pass out of existence, die" since the 1300s. The two variants--adding on [c. 1800] and over [c. 1900]--allude to moving to some other-worldly realm.

    Regards.

    V.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. lexical difficulty measure
    By simin in forum Text Analysis and Statistics
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 24-Jul-2007, 08:38
  2. spoiled for choices
    By Romel Panzer in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 21-Feb-2007, 10:23
  3. Lexical density
    By Carolina2000 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 20-Feb-2007, 15:29
  4. Lexical density
    By kkookk2003 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 03-Nov-2006, 09:32
  5. lexical fields
    By jpjp in forum Linguistics
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 25-Sep-2006, 17:36

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •