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    Default sentence

    I have a confussion between complex and compound sentence.

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    Default Re: sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by EMAIL REMOVED - Send PM to This User Instead
    I have a confussion between complex and compound sentence.
    A compound sentence is when two independent clauses are joined by a co-ordinating conjunction: and, but, or, for, yet, so

    EX: I like coffee, and he likes tea.
    EX: I like coffee, but I don't like latte.
    EX: Does she like coffee, or does she like tea?
    EX: I like coffee, so I am going to order a coffee.
    EX: I like coffee, yet I think I will order tea instead.

    A compound sentence is made up of two independent clauses:

    1) I like coffee. (independent clause)
    2) He likes tea. (independent clause)
    => I like coffee, and he likes tea. (compound sentence)

    A complex sentence is made up of an independent clause and a dependent clause. Depedent clauses begin with a subordinating conjunction,

    after
    although
    as
    as if
    as long as
    as though
    because
    before
    even if
    even though
    if
    if only
    in order that
    now that
    once
    rather than
    since
    so that
    than
    that
    though
    till
    unless
    until
    when
    whenever
    where
    whereas
    wherever
    while

    Only complex sentence have dependent clauses. Dependent clauses begin with a subordinating conjunction:

    EX: After she left, I did the dishes.
    EX: When you go to the store, could you pick up some milk?
    EX: He wants me work because he needs extra people.
    EX: Could you show me so that I can understand?

    A complex sentence is made up of an independent clause and a dependent clause,

    1) After she left. (dependent clause. It begins with "After", a subordinator)
    2) I did the dishes. (independent clause)
    ==> After she left, I did the dishes. (complex sentence)
    ==> I did the dishes, after she left. (complex sentence)

    There are also complex-compound sentences:

    After she left, Mary went to sleep and I did the dishes.

    1) After she left. (Dependent clause)
    2) Mary went to sleep. (Independent clause)
    3) I did the dishes. (Independent clause)

    Note that, the subordinating conjunction "After" tells us that "After she left" is a dependent clause, and that the co-ordinating conjunction "and" tells us that there are two independent clauses.

    All the best, :D

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