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  1. #1
    5iang Guest

    Red face yesterday night? last night?

    I'm sure that languages change at all times. But could it be possible that someone would say "yesterday night" instead of "last night" now? Is it acceptable?
    Thank you.

  2. #2
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    Smile Re: yesterday night? last night?

    Hi, both versions are perfectly acceptable in my opinion.

  3. #3
    Anglika is offline No Longer With Us
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    Re: yesterday night? last night?

    Quote Originally Posted by 5iang View Post
    I'm sure that languages change at all times. But could it be possible that someone would say "yesterday night" instead of "last night" now? Is it acceptable?
    Thank you.
    So far as I am aware, it always has been acceptable and it is certainly possible.

    [Davies/BYU] BYU-BNC: British National Corpus

  4. #4
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Re: yesterday night? last night?

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    So far as I am aware, it always has been acceptable and it is certainly possible.

    [Davies/BYU] BYU-BNC: British National Corpus
    It's interesting, though, that while 'last night' and 'yesterday night' are both acceptable, only 'yesterday evening' is (in my dialect, that is, which is pretty middle-of-the-road - my son once had a nursery rhyme tape with a song that started 'Last evening Cousin Peter came' - which struck me as very odd).

    http://sara.natcorp.ox.ac.uk/cgi-bin...terday+evening (90 hits)

    but

    http://sara.natcorp.ox.ac.uk/cgi-bin...y=last+evening (64 hits)

    b

  5. #5
    riverkid is offline Banned
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    Re: yesterday night? last night?

    This issue has come up before, in my ESL experience, and I found that BrE speakers found 'yesterday night' acceptable, much to my surprise as it was something I had never come across. There's no reason, of course that it couldn't be or isn't but it is still strange in my neck of the woods.

    'last evening' is copasetic.

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    Horsa is offline Senior Member
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    Re: yesterday night? last night?

    Yes, I agree I have no problem with 'yesterday night' either.

    'Last evening' is 'acceptable' to me but I probably wouldn't describe it as 'very acceptable' as it sounds somewhat old-fashioned to my ear.

    I'd be interested in what North Americans feel about 'tomorrow night' which would seem to be similar to 'yesterday night' is that also odd?

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    2006 is offline Banned
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    Re: yesterday night? last night?

    Quote Originally Posted by Horsa View Post
    Yes, I agree I have no problem with 'yesterday night' either.

    'Last evening' is 'acceptable' to me but I probably wouldn't describe it as 'very acceptable' as it sounds somewhat old-fashioned to my ear.

    I'd be interested in what North Americans feel about 'tomorrow night' which would seem to be similar to 'yesterday night' is that also odd?
    No, "tomorrow evening/night" is the common expression.

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    Re: yesterday night? last night?

    "Yesterday night" in the U.S.A. marks you as a foreigner. We always say "las' night." My ESL students always say "yesterday night." As for tomorrow night, if we say, "Monday night" the person would respond, "Tomorrow?" I don't know of any option for tomorrow nor why we always say last night. It is possible, but pretty far fetched, that because we have a tendency to shorten everything, we prefer the shorter "last" to the longer "yesterday"-? However, we DO say "yesterday afternoon" not "last afternoon." None of my etymology or ESL books address this. Now I'm hooked on finding an answer. I always tell my students that U.S. Americans usually take the path of least resistance.

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    Horsa is offline Senior Member
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    Re: yesterday night? last night?

    "Yesterday night" in the U.S.A. marks you as a foreigner. We always say "las' night."

    Hold on there - we have a misunderstanding I think. To me 'yesterday night' is not the same as 'last night'. It refers to the night before 'last night'

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    NearThere is offline Member
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    Re: yesterday night? last night?

    I'm learning new things everyday on this forum. Thank you so much!

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