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    • Join Date: Feb 2008
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    #1

    'More strict' vs 'stricter'

    Hey,

    I have surfed a bit and I know that 'stricter' is preferred but is it all right to use 'more strict'?


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    #2

    Smile Re: 'More strict' vs 'stricter'

    Simply, 'no'. Stricter is the correct superlative.

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    #3

    Re: 'More strict' vs 'stricter'

    I don't think there is such a word as "stricter"

    The rules are strict.
    The writing rules are more strict.
    The speaking rules are the most strict.


    There is the noun form: strickness and the adverbial form strictly.


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    #4

    Smile Re: 'More strict' vs 'stricter'

    Susie, perhaps another US/UK difference?: this from the BBC website today -

    BBC NEWS | Europe | Euro MPs back stricter gun laws

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    #5

    Re: 'More strict' vs 'stricter'

    Yes, you are correct. I just don't like it

    Stricter and strickest can be used.

    (I'll have my Crow BBQ'ed please)


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    #6

    Re: 'More strict' vs 'stricter'

    Ok, I'm still a bit confused but thanks a lot anyway. I think it's safer to use 'stricter'. Cambridge Online Dictionaries seems to think so, too.

    I'm studying English and having a hard time with stuff like that. Did I just use 'stuff' on a language forum?


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    #7

    Smile Re: 'More strict' vs 'stricter'

    Mark, 'stuff' in the context you used it just then was coined in 1580...don't sweat about it!!!

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    #8

    Re: 'More strict' vs 'stricter'

    IMHO, both are acceptable.


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    #9

    Re: 'More strict' vs 'stricter'



    • Join Date: Jan 2009
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    #10

    Re: 'More strict' vs 'stricter'

    Hi

    I heard "more strict" the other day and it sounded a little odd.

    The rule goes that if you have a single syllable adjective, then add "er".

    As "strict" fits that description, I'd go with "stricter". That, of course, is not to say that in some parts of the US, Canada, or even the UK, "more strict" is being used and considered "natural".

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