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Thread: English usage

  1. #1
    Anonymous Guest

    Default English usage

    Hi,
    What do we use?, "enrolled in" or "enrolled for".

    Regards,
    Sujith

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Default Re: English usage

    Quote Originally Posted by Sujith
    Hi,
    What do we use?, "enrolled in" or "enrolled for".

    Regards,
    Sujith
    Both enrol in and enrol for mean register.

    1) 'for' of enrol for indicates the object, aim, or purpose of an action or activity

    EX: enrol for school/enrol for the course/enrol for special offers

    2) 'in' of enrol in indicates placing one's name in a roll, list, or record

    EX: enrol in school/enrol in the course

    If the object of 'enrol', say, school or course, refers to a list you can add your name to, then use either 'in' or 'for'. If the object of 'enrol' does not have a list you can add your name to, then you can't use 'in'

    EX: enrol for special offers (OK)
    EX: enrol in special offers (Not OK)

    'special offers' doesn't have a list you can add your name to. That is, you register to get (i.e. for) special offers.

    All the best, :D

  3. #3
    sujith2201 Guest

    Default Re: English usage

    Thnx Casiopea :?

  4. #4
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    Default Re: English usage

    Quote Originally Posted by sujith2201
    Thnx Casiopea :?
    You're welcome. :D

  5. #5
    jack_yond Guest

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    :)

  6. #6
    jack_yond Guest

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    just now , i only relize the importance of E.L.
    harder and harder , gain myself ~~

  7. #7
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    • Member Info
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    Hi, Jack_Yond, and welcome. I'd say 'improve myself' rather than 'gain myself'.

  8. #8
    jack_yond Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    Hi, Jack_Yond, and welcome. I'd say 'improve myself' rather than 'gain myself'.
    :wink: i think i have to improve myself with others' help , hoho

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