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Thread: Old duck

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    #1

    Old duck

    Hi all,
    What is the most common meaning (without any context) of calling somebody "old duck"? If there is any common meaning for that at all...

    Thank you!

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    #2

    Re: Old duck

    I've heard of "old dog" or "old goat" before, but never "old duck"

    Sure you heard it right?

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    #3

    Re: Old duck

    Sure, it is written... (Although it could be misspelled, of course)

    It is a text in which the author (English, not American) lists a few ways of calling people related to animals and that is the reason I said there was no context:

    «The animal lurking inside human beings was obvious, screeched Punch with delight: slimy reptiles, old ducks, snakes in the grass...»
    Being Punch the famous English Magazine.

    So, What kind of person was an «Old duck»?

    Thanks!!

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    #4

    Re: Old duck

    Some (older) BrE speakers use "duck" or "duckie" (or "ducks") as a familiar term for the addressee, in conversation. The speaker is almost always female.

    Some (again, older) male BrE speakers use "old duck" as a term of affection for their wives.

    "Old duck" can also be used as a synonym for "old chap"; but this is very rare.

    These usages belong to very particular contexts and kinds of speaker; also, they now have a slightly old-fashioned air. So it's probably better for an ESL student to avoid them!

    Best wishes,

    MrP
    ·
    Not a professional ESL teacher.
    ·

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    #5

    Re: Old duck

    Thanks a lot, Mr.P
    Rgds

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