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Thread: Old duck

  1. #1
    jiho is offline Member
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    Default Old duck

    Hi all,
    What is the most common meaning (without any context) of calling somebody "old duck"? If there is any common meaning for that at all...

    Thank you!

  2. #2
    susiedqq is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: Old duck

    I've heard of "old dog" or "old goat" before, but never "old duck"

    Sure you heard it right?

  3. #3
    jiho is offline Member
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    Default Re: Old duck

    Sure, it is written... (Although it could be misspelled, of course)

    It is a text in which the author (English, not American) lists a few ways of calling people related to animals and that is the reason I said there was no context:

    «The animal lurking inside human beings was obvious, screeched Punch with delight: slimy reptiles, old ducks, snakes in the grass...»
    Being Punch the famous English Magazine.

    So, What kind of person was an «Old duck»?

    Thanks!!

  4. #4
    MrPedantic is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: Old duck

    Some (older) BrE speakers use "duck" or "duckie" (or "ducks") as a familiar term for the addressee, in conversation. The speaker is almost always female.

    Some (again, older) male BrE speakers use "old duck" as a term of affection for their wives.

    "Old duck" can also be used as a synonym for "old chap"; but this is very rare.

    These usages belong to very particular contexts and kinds of speaker; also, they now have a slightly old-fashioned air. So it's probably better for an ESL student to avoid them!

    Best wishes,

    MrP
    ·
    Not a professional ESL teacher.
    ·

  5. #5
    jiho is offline Member
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    Default Re: Old duck

    Thanks a lot, Mr.P
    Rgds

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