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  1. #1
    NewHope is offline Senior Member
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    Default an imp and an old imp

    A child who is playful and mischievous is called an imp or an urchin. And an old man who is still playful and mischievous like an imp should be called an old imp?

  2. #2
    Tdol is online now Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Why not? In British English we might say an 'old rogue'.

  3. #3
    NewHope is offline Senior Member
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    But how do you call a man who is really a rogue like that of 'rogue nation North Korea"?

  4. #4
    Tdol is online now Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    'Old rogue' is not as strong in this meaning- the collocation softens it. An 'oldrogue' is generally likeable.

  5. #5
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    Yes, 'old' often softens curse words. 'Bitch' is a notable exception ;)

    FRC

  6. #6
    NewHope is offline Senior Member
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    Hehe,very interesting.

  7. #7
    Tdol is online now Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Quote Originally Posted by Francois
    Yes, 'old' often softens curse words. 'Bitch' is a notable exception ;)

    FRC
    'Old fart' is another.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    Quote Originally Posted by Francois
    Yes, 'old' often softens curse words. 'Bitch' is a notable exception ;)

    FRC
    'Old fart' is another.
    :wink: y'ol dog, you

  9. #9
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    By the way, I'll stick my question to this topic :D :

    What epithet (or how it is called) do native English speakers use more frequently: Old Nick or Old Harry?

    And what those poor guys are guilty for...

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tanja
    By the way, I'll stick my question to this topic :D :

    What epithet (or how it is called) do native English speakers use more frequently: Old Nick or Old Harry?

    And what those poor guys are guilty for...
    I can't say. I've never heard those terms used in North American English. What about, Tom, Dick, and Harry? As a phrase, it's used to refer to any guy in general, any Tom, any Dick, and any Harry. :wink:

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