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Thread: up the stakes

  1. #1
    beeja is offline Member
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    Default up the stakes

    Help me, please

    1) Didn't that up the stakes considerably?

    Q: What does "up the stakes" mean?

    2) He woke in the dead dark with his head banging with all the gusto and violence of his young nephew slamming pot lids together. He managed to roll over to what he thought was his back. Thy way his head was pounding and spinning, he couldn't be sure.

    Q: There is nothing talking about his nephew (cousin) at all but why the author wrote "his young nephew slamming pot lids together" what does it exactly mean?

    3) You can pop me for the B and E. It'll sting. I'll get around it, but it'll sting.

    Q: B&E here is breaking and entering. But what is "It'll sting" mean here?

    4) It seems six of one to me.

    Q: What does it mean?

    5) His boss was unlikely to be pleased hed been busted slithering around the fine points of the law. Not that hed slithered, but that hed gotten caught.

    Q: What does "slithering around the fine points of the law" mean?

    That's all, thanks!!!

    :D

  2. #2
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    Default Re: up the stakes

    1) Didn't that up the stakes considerably?

    Q: What does "up the stakes" mean?
    raises the risk; heightens the value of what's at stake

    2) He woke in the dead dark with his head banging with all the gusto and violence of his young nephew slamming pot lids together. He managed to roll over to what he thought was his back. Thy way his head was pounding and spinning, he couldn't be sure.

    Q: There is nothing talking about his nephew (cousin) at all but why the author wrote "his young nephew slamming pot lids together" what does it exactly mean?
    The underlined portion functions as an adjective. It modifies "his head". It is used to describe the state of the man's head. His head is banging; What does the banging in his head sound like? It sound like his young nephew is slamming pot lids together.

    3) You can pop me for the B and E. It'll sting. I'll get around it, but it'll sting.

    Q: B&E here is breaking and entering. But what is "It'll sting" mean here?
    It will hurt (i.e., like a bee's sting), but it won't kill him. He will feel it for some time, but he will eventually get over it.

    4) It seems six of one to me.

    Q: What does it mean?
    I don't know. :? What's the rest of it/the context? :D

    5) His boss was unlikely to be pleased hed been busted slithering around the fine points of the law. Not that hed slithered, but that hed gotten caught.

    Q: What does "slithering around the fine points of the law" mean?
    :D[/quote]

    snakes slither; he was sly, cunning, crafty about the fine points of the law, not that virtuous in his dealings/actions. Note that, In Christian beliefs, the devil changed himself into a beautiful snake and had Eve trick Adam into eating the apple from the (forbidden) Tree of Knowledge. Snakes have a bad reputation in English culture.

  3. #3
    shane is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: up the stakes

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    4) It seems six of one to me.

    Q: What does it mean?
    I don't know. :? What's the rest of it/the context? :D
    That seems to be a shortened form of 'Six of one and half a dozen of the other'; meaning that both parties are equally to blame. ;)

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    Default Re: up the stakes

    Quote Originally Posted by shane
    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    4) It seems six of one to me.

    Q: What does it mean?
    I don't know. :? What's the rest of it/the context? :D
    That seems to be a shortened form of 'Six of one and half a dozen of the other'; meaning that both parties are equally to blame. ;)
    Shane's back from vacation! Welcome back. :D

  5. #5
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default

    Welcome back.

  6. #6
    shane is offline Senior Member
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    Default

    Thank you, people ;)

  7. #7
    beeja is offline Member
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    Default Re: up the stakes

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    4) It seems six of one to me.

    Q: What does it mean?
    I don't know. :? What's the rest of it/the context? :D

    [/quote]

    Well, it's about a man who was caught by a police on the B & E charge (Breaking and entering). A man tried to explain that he was a private detective and doing business for an insurance company. He was out with a woman who was a best friend of the police. The police suspected him that he might use his friend. Below is the conversation between them.

    Max: "You told her all that? About the used to be a cop, going private, working on a case here in the Gap?"

    Just his luck, Max decided, to run foul of the Norman Rockwell version of a hard-ass town cop. "Is this about my relationship with Laine or about me being inside the shop?"

    Police: "Six of one to me. What's the case you're working on?"

    Max "I'm not giving you any details on that until I talk to my client".


    So, what do you think "six of one to me" mean?

  8. #8
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    Default Re: up the stakes

    Quote Originally Posted by beeja
    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    4) It seems six of one to me.

    Q: What does it mean?
    I don't know. :? What's the rest of it/the context? :D
    Well, it's about a man who was caught by a police on the B & E charge (Breaking and entering). A man tried to explain that he was a private detective and doing business for an insurance company. He was out with a woman who was a best friend of the police. The police suspected him that he might use his friend. Below is the conversation between them.

    Max: "You told her all that? About the used to be a cop, going private, working on a case here in the Gap?"

    Just his luck, Max decided, to run foul of the Norman Rockwell version of a hard-ass town cop. "Is this about my relationship with Laine or about me being inside the shop?"

    Police: "Six of one to me. What's the case you're working on?"

    Max "I'm not giving you any details on that until I talk to my client".


    So, what do you think "six of one to me" mean? [/quote]

    Thanks for the context. :D It means, both: the relationship and his being in the shop. Did you see Shane's post? Here is it:

    Quote Originally Posted by Shane
    That seems to be a shortened form of 'Six of one and half a dozen of the other'; meaning that both parties are equally to blame.

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