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  1. #1
    vil is offline VIP Member
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    Default being wiped out of his good books.

    Dear teachers,

    By further reading the John Galsworthy ‘s “Acme ” I came up once again against a difficulty concerning two complicated for me sentences with some ill-defined expressions.

    Would you be kind enough to examine my interperttions?

    When I came to think of it. I had surely taken an extravagant liberty in marketing the thing without consulting him. I fell he would never forgive that and my feeling towards him was so affectionate, even reverential, that I simply hated the ides of being wiped out of his good books. At last I hit on a way, that by introducing my own interest might break my fall. I cashed the cheque, lodged the money at my bank, drew my own cheque on it for the full amount, and, armed with that and the contract, went to see him.

    I…hated the idea of being wiped out of his good books. = I was afraid of losing his friendship (to be in one’s good (bad) books – to be in one’s favor (disfavor).

    I hit on a way that by introducing my own interest might break my fall. = I thought of a way that by making him believe I was personally interested in the matter might help me (might make things easier for me).

    Regards.

    V.

  2. #2
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    buggles is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: being wiped out of his good books.

    Iv'e not read Acme, but both of your interpretations make perfect sense to me.

  3. #3
    vil is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: being wiped out of his good books.

    Hi buggles,

    Thank you for your kindness.

    Regards.

    V.

  4. #4
    susiedqq is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: being wiped out of his good books.

    I, too, have not read Galsworthy, but I'd be willing to bet it is a financial reference.

    To "be in good books" is to have credit or financial dealings with someone.

    Just a guess, here. What is the vocation of the main character?

  5. #5
    vil is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: being wiped out of his good books.

    Hi susiedqq,

    The context witnesses the plausibility of my original speculation concerning the meaning of the expression “being wiped out of his good books”.

    There are some explanatory particularities.

    In these days no man of genius need starve. The following story of my fiend Bruce may be taken as proof of this assertion. Nearly sixty when I first knew him, he must have written already some fifteen books, which had earned him the reputation of a “genius” with the few who know. (an exclusive circle of bourgeois intellectuals who believed themselves and were believed by members of the upper classes to be intellectually superior to common people; usually referred to as “the few select” or “the elite”……

    I suppose there never as a writer more indifferent to what people though of him. He profoundly neglected the Press- not with one of their own works-he seemed never to read criticism, but with the basic neglect of “an original”, a nomadic spirit, a stranger in modern civilization, who would leave his attics for long months of wandering and come back there to hibernate and write a book.

    ….The year of which I write had been to my friend Bruce the devil, monetarily speaking. With his passion for writing that for which his age had no taste-what could he expect? His last book had been a complete frost. He had undergone, too, an operation which had cost him much money and left him very weak…..
    He (Bruce) had written a skit (a short humorous or satirical piece of writing).

    The author read the skit and was excited about its perfection. Bruce had written a perfect scenario. It was a little gold-mine if properly handled. Any good company, would catch at it. But how to handle it? Bruce was such an unaccountable creature, such a wild old bird! If the told him his skit was a serious film, he would say “Good God!” and put it in the fire, priceless though it was. And yet, how could he (the author) market it without carte blanche?...

    .. the author was deathly keen on getting some money for him(Bruce)….
    …the author promptly rough-shaped the skit for the film. It was perfectly easy, without alteration of the story.
    .. he (the author) took it (the scenario) to an excellent company next day. He take it to them with no name attached, but tell them it was by a “genius”. Later he (the author) signed a contract, delivered the manuscript, and received a cheque for three thousand pounds. He was elated and the same time knew that his troubles were jaust beginning. With Bruce’s feeling about the film how the deuce should he get him to take the money? Could he go to his publishers and conspire with them to trickle it out to him gradually as if it came from his books? Should he send him the money in Bank of England notes with the words “From a lifelong admirer of your genius?”

    The author was afraid of telling Bruce what had become of the skit. He was afraid of losing his friendship. He have to try to prove to Bruce that the latter had done people a benefit.

    Regards.

    V.

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