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Thread: too much gas

  1. #31
    lucyarliwu Guest

    Default Re: too much gas

    Quote Originally Posted by shane

    Lucy, "Chow Mein" is simply "" in Mandarin!! :D
    Sorry, Shane?

    I'm afraid I can't understand what that special mark means?!

    So could you help me in another way if it's easy for you?

    Thanks Shane in advance! ;)

  2. #32
    lucyarliwu Guest

    Default Re: too much gas

    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    P.S. Here is a link to the language quizzes: http://www.funtrivia.com/quizlistgold.cfm?cat=4563

    This one is specifically about words English "borrowed" from Chinese:
    http://www.funtrivia.com/quizdetails.cfm?id=87206

    This will give you a "head start" on the Chinese/English quiz:
    http://spotlightongames.com/quote/chinesewords.html

    8)
    Thanks Ron for your corrections for me on the following sentence:

    "I have looked up the rest of the unclear words, but I still don't know what chow mein is." (Does that seem right?)

    It's quite right after your amending. :) It seems that what I wrote before is just one good example of "pidgin English",am I right? ;)

    BTW, thanks for the links, I'll try them later since the linking here is pretty slow. :(

  3. #33
    RonBee's Avatar
    RonBee is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: too much gas

    "I have looked up the rest of the unclear words, but I still don't know what chow mein is." (Does that seem right?)

    It's quite right after your amending. :) It seems that what I wrote before is just one good example of "pidgin English",am I right? ;)
    I am not sure, but I think pidgin English has more to do with speech than writing. I don't really know much about it tho. It might be something interesting to do a little research on.

    BTW, thanks for the links, I'll try them later since the linking here is pretty slow. :(
    Perhaps it is your Internet connection. The links always work fine for me.

    Here is another word we English speakers got from China: silk. Interesting, huh? You are probably familiar with the ancient trading route called the Silk Road. I am sure there are a lot of interesting stories that are associated with that.

    http://spotlightongames.com/quote/chinesewords.html

    8)

  4. #34
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    Default Re: too much gas

    Here are some more English words that were "borrowed" from Chinese.

    bohea
    bonze
    cangue
    cash
    China
    ginkgo
    ginseng
    Hun
    Japan
    judo
    junk
    kaolin
    ketchup
    ling
    loquat
    mien
    oolong
    pan
    pekoe
    shaman
    tan
    tofu
    Turk
    tycoon
    typhoon
    yen
    wok

    http://acadprojwww.wlu.edu/vol4/Blac...d/chinese.html

    8)

  5. #35
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default

    char

  6. #36
    RonBee's Avatar
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    Default English Words from Chinese



    pidgin
    • a simplified speech used for communication between people with different languages from "pidgin English", pidgin being the word in pidgin English for "business", i.e. a changed form of the English word "business". Pidgin English is/was a form of Chinese English used for business purposes in the Orient.




    :)

  7. #37
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    Default Re: too much gas

    Quote Originally Posted by lucyarliwu
    I couldn't help wondering when you mentioned the word 'tea' is from China, ya, and just as Tdol said it's 'cha' in chinese pronuciation, but how could it turn into 'tea' which is obviously different from 'cha', so as the 'cash', 'pidgin'??? :? Lucy in curiosity
    From the Chinese, Amoy dialect t'e:
    Dutch tee, chief importers (1610)
    French the
    Spanish te
    German tee
    English tea (1644)

    From the Chinese, Mandarin dialect ch'a
    Russian cha
    Persian cha
    Greek tsai
    Turkish say

    From French caisse
    English cash

    From the Chinese pronunciation of business.
    English pidgin

    www.etymonline.com

    :D

  8. #38
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    The Portuguese say 'cha' and it was a Portuguese princess, married to Charles II (I believe), who introduced tea to Britain.

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    The Portuguese say 'cha' and it was a Portuguese princess, married to Charles II (I believe), who introduced tea to Britain.
    His-story :D

  10. #40
    Susie Smith Guest

    Default Cha

    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    IN England we also call tea 'char', which is much closer to the Chinese.
    In Portuguese (at least in Brazil) the word for tea is "ch" which is pronounced as "shah". I had no idea it came from Chinese!

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