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Thread: too much gas

  1. #51
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    Default Re: too much gas

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    Quote Originally Posted by lucyarliwu
    I couldn't help wondering when you mentioned the word 'tea' is from China, ya, and just as Tdol said it's 'cha' in chinese pronuciation, but how could it turn into 'tea' which is obviously different from 'cha', so as the 'cash', 'pidgin'??? :? Lucy in curiosity
    From the Chinese, Amoy dialect t'e:
    Dutch tee, chief importers (1610)
    French the
    Spanish te
    German tee
    English tea (1644)

    From the Chinese, Mandarin dialect ch'a
    Russian cha
    Persian cha
    Greek tsai
    Turkish say

    From French caisse
    English cash

    From the Chinese pronunciation of business.
    English pidgin

    www.etymonline.com

    :D
    Tea exported from the sea port of Amoy (in Fujian province north of Canton) through Malay and to the Netherland follows the Amoy (Taiwanese) sound of te. (Fujian has been a tea producing area.)

    Tea went from the North through the land route -silk road- to Central Asia (Iran, Trukey) are called cha, following the Mandarin (northern Chinese) sound of cha. (Mandarin is the Beijing dialect.)

    Ancient Chinese are preserved better in southern dialects, like Amoy and Fujianese (Taiwanese), and in Chinese loan words in Japanese, Vietnamese and Korean. Southern Chinese took ancient Chinese to the South when they migrated from the North, escaping from northern "barbarians" and the Mongols. (Northen Chinese are influenced more by other languages.)

  2. #52
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    Default Re: too much gas

    Quote Originally Posted by bmo
    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    Quote Originally Posted by lucyarliwu
    I couldn't help wondering when you mentioned the word 'tea' is from China, ya, and just as Tdol said it's 'cha' in chinese pronuciation, but how could it turn into 'tea' which is obviously different from 'cha', so as the 'cash', 'pidgin'??? :? Lucy in curiosity
    From the Chinese, Amoy dialect t'e:
    Dutch tee, chief importers (1610)
    French the
    Spanish te
    German tee
    English tea (1644)

    From the Chinese, Mandarin dialect ch'a
    Russian cha
    Persian cha
    Greek tsai
    Turkish say

    From French caisse
    English cash

    From the Chinese pronunciation of business.
    English pidgin

    www.etymonline.com

    :D
    Tea exported from the sea port of Amoy (in Fujian province north of Canton) through Malay and to the Netherland follows the Amoy (Taiwanese) sound of te. (Fujian has been a tea producing area.)

    Tea went from the North through the land route -silk road- to Central Asia (Iran, Trukey) are called cha, following the Mandarin (northern Chinese) sound of cha. (Mandarin is the Beijing dialect.)

    Ancient Chinese are preserved better in southern dialects, like Amoy and Fujianese (Taiwanese), and in Chinese loan words in Japanese, Vietnamese and Korean. Southern Chinese took ancient Chinese to the South when they migrated from the North, escaping from northern "barbarians" and the Mongols. (Northen Chinese are influenced more by other languages.)

    So tea is more ancient than cha.
    Moroccan: atay

  3. #53
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    Default Re: too much gas

    Cas,

    I am impressed with your knowledege of the origin of tea and cha. You have a very broad understanding of cultures.

    BMO

  4. #54
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    Default Re: too much gas

    Quote Originally Posted by bmo
    Cas,

    I am impressed with your knowledege of the origin of tea and cha. You have a very broad understanding of cultures.

    BMO
    Thank you. :D Mind you, I found it at: www.etymonline.com :wink: The source is located at the bottom of the post.

  5. #55
    RonBee's Avatar
    RonBee is offline Moderator
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    Wow! There is a lot there about tea. Thanks, Cas!



    :D

  6. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    IN England we also call tea 'char', which is much closer to the Chinese.
    I know it is such a long time to make a reply on this topic, however I want to say that we say "chai" in local Imarati accent which we derived from Hindi .

    Tea, Char, Cha, or Chai it tastes wonderful :D

  7. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Latoof
    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    IN England we also call tea 'char', which is much closer to the Chinese.
    I know it is such a long time to make a reply on this topic, however I want to say that we say "chai" in local Imarati accent which we derived from Hindi .

    Tea, Char, Cha, or Chai it tastes wonderful :D
    Tea for Latoof. :D

  8. #58
    woshi410 Guest

    Default Re: too much gas

    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    In Italian:
    piano
    In English:
    slowly

    (From Dictionary.com translator)

    8)
    I see.

  9. #59
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    Default Re: too much gas

    It is interesting to see experts dissect "simple everyday" words like piano and tea. Here, we call it TSA. Most Chinese in our place came from AMOY. Local folks consider it medicinal and only drank when one has (I hope nobody is eating, please excuse me) diarrhea. Most of us, if not soda or water, coffee drinkers (US influence? most probably). In music, we were taught that piano means softly, pianissimo means most softly.
    RAM

  10. #60
    Suzanne55 is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: too much gas

    Piano in Italian is used to indicate both 'slow' and 'quiet'. It can be used to ask someone to slow down or to keep their voice down.

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