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Thread: so/then


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
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    #1

    so/then

    So,and then can both be used to mean 'since that is so'. There is a slight difference. Then is most often used when one speaker replies to another:it means 'It follows from what you have said'. We do not normally use then when the same speaker wants to connect two ideas ('It follows from what I have said'). So can be used in both ways.
    Wow! The difference is sooo slight that I don't even get it. Would you paraphrase his words or comment on this.



    It's more expensive to travel on Friday, so I'll leave on Thursday evening. :D
    It's more expensive to travel on Friday, then I'll leave on Thursday evening. :(

    'It's more expensive to travel on Friday.' 'Then/So I'll leave on Thursday evening.'
    I've noticed that the latter example contains quotations that make 'then' semantically smoother. Right?


    • Join Date: Jun 2004
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    #2
    Schizophrenics can use both interchangeably.

    FRC


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    #3


    and Long time no see.


    • Join Date: Jun 2004
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    #4
    It was to make your heart grow fonder (ok, and give everybody a break too).

    FRC


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    #5
    Indeed. Psychologist!

  1. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #6

    Re: so/then

    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    So,and then can both be used to mean 'since that is so'. There is a slight difference. Then is most often used when one speaker replies to another:it means 'It follows from what you have said'. We do not normally use then when the same speaker wants to connect two ideas ('It follows from what I have said'). So can be used in both ways.
    Wow! The difference is sooo slight that I don't even get it. Would you paraphrase his words or comment on this.

    1. It's more expensive to travel on Friday, so I'll leave on Thursday evening. :D
    2. It's more expensive to travel on Friday, then I'll leave on Thursday evening. :(
    3. It's more expensive to travel on Friday.' 'Then/So I'll leave on Thursday evening.'
    I've noticed that the latter example contains quotations that make 'then' semantically smoother. Right?
    so = based on my knowledge
    then = based on your knowledge

    1. It's more expensive to travel on Friday, so (i.e., based on what I now know), I'll leave on Thursday. :D

    2. It's more expensive to travel on Friday, you say? OK, then (i.e., based on what you know), I'll leave on Thursday. :D

    3. It's more expensive to travel on Friday, you say? OK, so (i.e., based on what I now know), then (i.e., based on what you know), I'll leave on Thursday. :D


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    #7
    Cas,

    Has anyone said you ROCK today? If no, let me be the first! :D

  2. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #8
    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    Cas,

    Has anyone said you ROCK today? If no, let me be the first! :D
    Why, thank you. :D


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
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    #9
    That was excellent explanation!

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