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    #1

    a big mouth or big mouth

    Teachers,

    To tell a person that he talks too much, which of the following is correct to use?
    You have a big mouth. vs You have big mouth.

    Thank you.

  1. stuartnz's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: a big mouth or big mouth

    I am not a teacher of English, but in the phrase you describe, you do need the indefinite article "a". So "you have a big mouth." The phrase "big mouth" is also commonly used as a noun, which means that you could also say "you are a big mouth". Either would be acceptable in most variants of English, although the latter might be slightly more informal.
    Last edited by stuartnz; 16-Mar-2008 at 11:51. Reason: insert missing close quote marks.


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    #3

    Re: a big mouth or big mouth

    It means that the person has revealed some information or a secret that he shouldn't have.
    Another expression meaning the same thing is 'blabbermouth'.
    Neither of these is the word or expression you are seeking. Of course, the word for just plain 'talkative' is 'loquacious'; and 'garrulous' for exceesively talkative on trivial matters; but you're looking for a good old piece of slang or an idiom. Unaccustomed as I am to having to say this any more, to any of my contemporaries, I'll have to think and try to remember what we said in the primary school playground.

    The first that occurs to me is: "God, you can run on at the mouth!" - the oath is optional.
    Another, meaning to talk incessantly, is 'talk nineteen to the dozen'.

    Anyone else got favourites they want to share?
    Last edited by David L.; 17-Mar-2008 at 01:49.

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: a big mouth or big mouth

    Perhaps the easiest way to use it, in a colloquial accusation, would be to use the noun on its own: 'Big mouth' [=you are/have a big mouth]. The stress is on the first syllable.

    Another way of saying it would be to use sarcasm: 'You're about as subtle as a megaphone' [note - this isn't an idiom, and if it becomes one I want my 10%!]

    b

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    #5

    Re: a big mouth or big mouth

    Please teacher, I've heard lots of americans say

    1) mouth to mouth
    2) hand to hand
    3) hand in hand
    4) hand to mouth

    What do they mean? Could you give us some examples?

    Many thanks.

  4. BobK's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: a big mouth or big mouth

    Quote Originally Posted by marciobarbalho View Post
    Please teacher, I've heard lots of americans say

    1) mouth to mouth
    2) hand to hand
    3) hand in hand
    4) hand to mouth

    What do they mean? Could you give us some examples?

    Many thanks.
    Try sites such as this: http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings; but I haven't found any one that has all you need. Here are some definitions to start you off:

    'mouth to mouth' - informal (incomplete and inexact) reference to CPR ("Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation" I think) - http://www.med.umich.edu/1libr/aha/cpr.gif (see what I mean by 'incomplete'? - 'mouth to mouth' describes only picture 2 in this chart.)
    'hand to hand' - fighting directly, using swords/daggers/bayonets; e.g. 'hand to hand combat'
    'hand in hand' - closely connected; if the connection is illegal or otherwise covert, it is called 'hand in glove': 'Many people suspect that the police and the judges are hand in glove with the Mafia.'. 'Hand in hand' can often be used as a simple physical description meaning 'holding [each other's] hand[s]': 'The young lovers were walking along hand in hand.'
    'hand to mouth' - living precariously, immediately spending earnings on necessities: 'the tramp was living from hand to mouth'

    b

  5. Offroad's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: a big mouth or big mouth

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post

    'mouth to mouth' - informal (incomplete and inexact) reference to CPR ("Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation" I think) - http://www.med.umich.edu/1libr/aha/cpr.gif (see what I mean by 'incomplete'? - 'mouth to mouth' describes only picture 2 in this chart.)

    Thanks Bob, but I think this is an American slang/idiom, maybe it has something to do with talk-ative persons or something like that.
    but whether anyone google it, he will find something like Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation as you just said.
    Thank you very much

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    #8

    Re: a big mouth or big mouth

    Are you perhaps thinking of motormouth - Definitions from Dictionary.com ? If not, it's an idiom I haven't met.

    b

  7. Offroad's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: a big mouth or big mouth

    no, it's not motormouth, but thanks for your help, Bob. It's helped a lot.
    But... So, could some American native clarify this last idiom?

    Many thanks
    Last edited by Offroad; 17-Mar-2008 at 01:47.

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