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  1. #1
    NearThere is offline Member
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    Default stick to or stick with

    When do you use one over the other? Here're 2 sentences:

    Let's stick to the plan and get to work.
    If I were you, I'd stick with what he has planned............

    Are they both grammatically acceptable?

    Many thanks in advance
    NT

  2. #2
    Barb_D's Avatar
    Barb_D is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: stick to or stick with

    They both sound okay to my American ears and I don't see any difference between them.

  3. #3
    NearThere is offline Member
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    Default Re: stick to or stick with

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    They both sound okay to my American ears and I don't see any difference between them.
    Thanks Barb.

    Are there situations when you can only use one not the other. Could you give examples (The more the merrier).

    Thanks

    NT

  4. #4
    Barb_D's Avatar
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    Default Re: stick to or stick with

    Hmm. Maybe something like this. It's the end of the day and things didn't go well. We're meeting to talk about what we'll do tomorrow. Should we stick with the original plan or try something new?

    We're at work, and I wander by to see how everyone is doing. You think that you'd like to try something difference. "Stick to the plan for now," I say.

    So maybe while planning - stick with, and while doing - stick to?

    I'm speculating ... sometimes the more you think about something the harder it is to remember.

  5. #5
    vil is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: stick to or stick with

    Attention: I'm not a teacher.

    Hi NearThere,

    There are further examples of practical usages of the expressions “stick to” and “stick with.”

    stick to
    • Remain faithful to; see stick by.
      2. Persist in or continue applying oneself to, as in
    I'm sticking to my opinion that he's basically honest, or
    The music teacher told John to stick to the clarinet, at least until the end of the year.

    stick with
    Continue to support or be faithful to, as in
    They stuck with us through all our difficulties.

    stick by
    Remain loyal to, as in
    The brothers said they'd stick by one another, no matter what, or Phyllis promised to stick to Bert. This idiom derives from stick in the sense of "adhere."

    stick to - be faithful to (one’s ideals, a friend, etc), remain determined
    Not change, continue at, to keep using or doing one particular thing and not change to anything else:
    If you're driving, stick to soft drinks.

    - Restrict or limit and not change
    -to do or keep doing what you said you would do or what you believe in, even when it is difficult [= keep to]:
    Have you been sticking to your diet?
    stick to doing something
    Reporters should stick to investigating the facts.

    stick to your guns informal to refuse to change your mind about something, even though other people are trying to persuade you that you are wrong:
    Having made up his mind, he stuck to his guns.

    stick to the point/subject/facts to talk only about what you are supposed to be talking about or what is certain:
    Never mind whose fault it was. Just stick to the facts.

    stick to your decision/principles etc
    Miguel was determined to stick to his decision.
    It looks as if Nick will stick to his word this time.

    stick to the rules informal to do something exactly according to the rules
    stick to the path/road etc to stay on a marked path or road so that you do not get lost

    stick to the/your story spoken to continue to say that what you have told someone is true, even though they do not believe you:
    You intend to stick to this story that she knew nothing of your financial prospects?

    stick with – remain loyal to, continue to support
    Not change something
    - Stay near someone
    to stay close to someone:
    You just stick with me. I'll explain everything as we go along.

    - Not be forgotten, to remain in someone's memory:
    Those words will stick with me for the rest of my life.

    - to continue doing something, especially something difficult or unpleasant
    If you stick with it, your playing will gradually get better.

    stick with something/somebody phrasal verb
    1 to continue doing something the way you did or planned to do before:
    Let's stick with the original plans.

    be stuck with something/somebody to be made to accept something, do something, spend time with someone etc, when they do not want to:
    Bill left and I was stuck with the bill.

    To stick to business!
    To stick to the point!
    To stick to one’s word.
    To stick to one’s promise.
    To stick to one’s opinion.
    To stick to one’s resolve.
    To stick to one’s ideals.
    To stick to one’s duty.
    To stick to a task until it is finished.
    To stick by some principle.
    Jean has stuck by her husband through thick and thin.
    He has stuck by his radical plans for economic reform
    He stuck by his friend in his troubles.
    To stick to one’s post.
    He sticks to his story.
    To stick to one’s gun.
    Stick to the facts!
    Stick to the text!
    He stuck to us in through thick and thin.
    To stick with a friend.
    To stick with an idea.

    I'd generally go to supper by eight, and when we stick to these old-fashioned rules we shall make our visitors conform to them too.
    Most big shops stick to this.
    We've simply got to stick to our pattern.
    "I'll definitely stick to wearing them in the future," he told me in an exclusive interview.
    "When we make deals we stick to them but the company has changed quite dramatically in the past year.
    Dust particles then stick to these greasy carpet fibers, causing them to sag and fade in color.
    No I think we should stick to local government branches in the county of Northumberland.
    Well let's stick to Friday then and let's Well let's let's chairman.
    Let's stick to this concept.
    If they wish they can stick to the bare bones of the task, as an intellectual exercise, but if…
    Consider the need to stick to market standards such as buying an IBM-compatible personal computer.
    It is worthwhile to choose a rehearsal room which suits your music, and stick to it.
    So stick to the design specification.
    Should she feed her child on demand or stick to a rigid timetable?
    It should not always be necessary to stick to the traditional layout of interviewer behind a desk and candidate in a chair immediately….

    Most sufferers stick with their jobs and take medication but others have to quit.
    But even though she is dying to leave, she has to stick with it because there is no alternative.
    I've persuaded them to stick with me and they have responded superbly.
    The company came in for quite a bit of stick with their new version of the Escort and if the Mondeo had not been well…
    And then stick with them, build them, help them to add to their earning power.
    Stick with me, Andy, and I'll make you a millionaire.
    Be patient and stick with it.
    So stick with it and please don't cheat once today!
    I'll just stick with Maureen.
    We'll we'll stick with that!
    I'm going to stick with him.

    Regards.

    V.

  6. #6
    NearThere is offline Member
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    Default Re: stick to or stick with

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Hmm. Maybe something like this. It's the end of the day and things didn't go well. We're meeting to talk about what we'll do tomorrow. Should we stick with the original plan or try something new?

    We're at work, and I wander by to see how everyone is doing. You think that you'd like to try something difference. "Stick to the plan for now," I say.

    So maybe while planning - stick with, and while doing - stick to?

    I'm speculating ... sometimes the more you think about something the harder it is to remember.
    That's some wisdom Barb. It's quite true.

    Here's another question, does this make sense: "I'll stick to her" with no intention to physically adhere to "her". I know using "with" would make more sense (it just sounds better), but what about "to"?

    Many thanks
    NT

  7. #7
    NearThere is offline Member
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    Default Re: stick to or stick with

    Thank Vil.

    You basically have answered my question to Barb. Based on your extensive explanation I think it's safe to say that when the intended object is a person we should use "with". Correct?

    Thanks
    NT

  8. #8
    krishman is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: stick to or stick with

    A stick generally refers to a long, slender piece of wood, usually a branch from a tree without the leaves that may be refined.

    Stick may refer to:
    Chopsticks, an eating utensil
    Rod, cane, or hickory stick, disciplinary implements
    Pointing stick, an indicator
    Swagger stick, a formal attribute
    Club (weapon) or staff (stick), weapons
    Tally sticks, a marking medium
    Walking stick, a mobility aid
    Fire stick, a stick for making fire

  9. #9
    NearThere is offline Member
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    Default Re: stick to or stick with

    Quote Originally Posted by krishman View Post
    A stick generally refers to a long, slender piece of wood, usually a branch from a tree without the leaves that may be refined.

    Stick may refer to:
    Chopsticks, an eating utensil
    Rod, cane, or hickory stick, disciplinary implements
    Pointing stick, an indicator
    Swagger stick, a formal attribute
    Club (weapon) or staff (stick), weapons
    Tally sticks, a marking medium
    Walking stick, a mobility aid
    Fire stick, a stick for making fire
    I have a feeling that you're pulling my leg.

    NT

  10. #10
    Barb_D's Avatar
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    Default Re: stick to or stick with

    If you talk about "sticking to" someone, you are speaking metaphorically, as though you WERE adhered together. I can only think of situations like I'm in a crowded store and I tell my small child to stick right to me (don't seperate by more than a few feet) or maybe something you would say to a body guard. You don't want any physical seperation.

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