View Poll Results: She's ____ European.

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Thread: European

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    #1

    European

    Why?


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    #2

    Re: European

    There's something wrong with European. :D

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    #3

  1. Tanja's Avatar

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    #4
    Does j in transcription count for a consonant sound? :? Or it is somewhere in between consonants and vowels :D


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    #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Tanja
    Does j in transcription count for a consonant sound? :? Or it is somewhere in between consonants and vowels :D
    Good question.

    To be more specific, it's a palatal glide.
    j is like consonant in that it can't stand along; it must precede(or follow) a vowel in order to form a syllable. /j/ and /w/ are sometimes called semivowels, and it may be said that they are the consonantal forms of the vowels /i/ and /u/.

    :D

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    #6
    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    Good question.

    To be more specific, it's a palatal glide.
    j is like consonant in that it can't stand along; it must precede(or follow) a vowel in order to form a syllable. /j/ and /w/ are sometimes called semivowels, and it may be said that they are the consonantal forms of the vowels /i/ and /u/.

    :D
    Great explanation, Blacknomi! Thank you!

    I do remember something like palatal glide from my phonetics class...but not much...
    My Introduction to Phonetics says: "[j] - constrictive, mediolingual, palatal sonant". Hmmm... this word "sonant"... it makes me confused... What is that?


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    #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Tanja
    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    Good question.

    To be more specific, it's a palatal glide.
    j is like consonant in that it can't stand along; it must precede(or follow) a vowel in order to form a syllable. /j/ and /w/ are sometimes called semivowels, and it may be said that they are the consonantal forms of the vowels /i/ and /u/.

    :D
    Great explanation, Blacknomi! Thank you!

    I do remember something like palatal glide from my phonetics class...but not much...
    My Introduction to Phonetics says: "[j] - constrictive, mediolingual, palatal sonant". Hmmm... this word "sonant"... it makes me confused... What is that?
    Thanks. You are most welcome. :D


    You mean "sonorant".


    Sonorants are sounds produced with a relatively FREE passage of air through the mouth or the nose. Notice: the opposite of sonorants are called 'obstruents'; the airstream cannot travel through the nose, it is obstructed(blocked) in the passage through the vocal tract.

    It is marked as [+son] or [-son].

    Sonorants:
    Nasal stops: m, n, ing
    Liquids: l, r
    Glides: j, w
    Vowels: you know that :D

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    #8
    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    Thanks. :D


    You mean "sonorant".


    Sonorants are sounds produced with a relatively FREE passage of air through the mouth or the nose. Notice: the opposite of sonorants are called 'obstruents'; the airstream cannot travel through the nose, it is obstructed(blocked) in the passage through the vocal tract.

    It is marked as [+son] or [-son].

    Sonorants:
    Nasal stops: m, n, ing
    Liquids: l, r
    Glides: j, w
    Vowels: you know that :D
    Sonorant instead of sonant? Funny! Is there really a misprint in the book?! :? :D

  4. Tanja's Avatar

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    #9
    Sonant=voiced consonant.
    That's what dictionary says.


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    #10
    You are right on that!

    And all sonorants are sonants! But not all sonants are sonorants. :D

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