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  1. #1
    vil is offline VIP Member
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    Default stammer / stutter

    Dear teachers,

    Would you help me to determine the difference between “stammer” and “stutter”.

    stammer (v) = to speak with involuntary pauses or repetitions.
    to utter with involuntary pauses or repetitions.

    stutter (v) = to speak or utter with a spasmodic repetition or prolongation of sounds.
    to speak with difficulty because you cannot stop yourself from repeating the first consonant of some words [stammer]:
    “'I'm D-d-david,' he stuttered.”

    “The child always stammers in her presence. “
    “She was so puzzled that she suddenly began to stammer.”
    “To stutter over p.”
    “I used to stutter a lot in those days, I was a very frightened boy.”

    “I dare say it was the look I gave him that made him stammer.”
    “..and she had already noticed that, when he began to stammer in speaking, that side of his face was affected with a nervous twitch.”
    “Her voice had a catch in it like her son’s and she stuttered slightly.”
    “But…but, sir, “he stammered , “this is very sudden decision.”
    “he stammered some words in excuse of his late visit.””I’d – don’t know” he stuttered.”
    “He stammered his congratulations”
    “He stuttered something about the whether.”

    “He seemed such a boy, as he stood blushing and stammering his thanks, that a wave of pity….welled up in her.”
    “Moinstening her lips, her soft eyes warmly, inarticulate, Susan Morgan tried to stammer out her gratitude.”
    “I – I only did my duty” stuttered the bank manager, his complexion turning muddier than before.”

    Thank you in advance for your efforts.

    Regards.

    V.

  2. #2
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    Snowcake is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: stammer / stutter

    Hello Vil,

    first of all I'd like to thank you for the links you've given to me in the other thread. I will answer soon.

    Your question:

    I think there is no difference concerning the common usage of stutter and stammer. I guess if you say "She always stutters and stammers when ..." this is something like "hendiadys" a rhetorical term, which means two words and one meaning. However, I found this:

    First off, consider how much easier it is to work with a stammer than a stutter. What's the difference? Some authorities maintain 'stutter' and 'stammer' are two words for the same thing, but I subscribe to the following definitions: a stutter is where the first syllable of the word is repeated over and over like a machine gun, without the second ever being reached. A stammer, in contrast, is where not even the first syllable can be articulated: there's just an ever-widening hole in the sentence. I believe that in this hole, this gap, you can find the silence, the calmness, you need to get the next word out. So, if your speech defect takes the form of a stutter, just some take time out when you get to the hazardous word.

    source: Let me speak, by David Mitchell - British Stammering Association

    Does that help?

    Regards,
    Snowcake

  3. #3
    vil is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: stammer / stutter

    Hi Snowcake,

    Thank you for your extensive research on the root of the matter concerning the similarity and distinction of the two English verbs namely “stammer” and “stutter”. Thank you also for your kind thought of me.

    I know further English words that have the same meaning namely: falter, hesitate, splutter, stumble. I leaved the latter out of account because I have clear idea of their meaning and usage. In regard to “stammer” and “stutter” the situation is disparate. Owing to your explanation in your last post and my personnel investigation I definitely regard as true that there is a subtle difference between “stammer” and “stutter”. Usually the usages of “stammer” hint a temporary unsteadiness in speech as a result of a suddenly scare (jtters) while the usages of “stutter” hint the presence of permanent defect in speech.

    Regards.

    V.

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