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  1. #1
    greystroke is offline Junior Member
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    Default Present perfect with past time

    Hi,

    Context : Classroom discussion on the use of the present perfect.

    e.g. I have lived in Delhi since 1985.
    Sachin Tendulkar's batting style has influenced every Indian batsmen since 1985.

    I know the grammar books say that a finished time expression is not to be used ( or taught) with the present perfect, but aren't the sentences above correct?( and I could give many other such examples) . Also, in the construction "I've just met her" aren't we referring to a past time - however recent?
    Can someone clarify please.

    Regards,

    Arun

  2. #2
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    Snowcake is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Present perfect with past time

    Are you (or the person concerned) still living in Delhi? If so, then it would turn into continuous form:


    I have been living in Delhi since 1985.

    2.
    Sachin Tendulkar's batting style has influenced every Indian batsmen since 1985.

    Sounds ok to me.

    The emphasis is put on the result of the activity, not the activity itself.

    You could also use continuous here:

    .....batting style has been influencing .... since 1985

    In this sentence you put the emphasis on the activity. It doesn't matter whether the activity has been finished.

    3. I've just met her.

    It's a new information. Imagine you are phoning a friend "Oh, I've just met Judy." Even though the meeting took place in the past, even if it's only 5 minutes ago, it's not wrong to you pres. perf.

    You could also say

    I met her (yesterday, 5 minutes ago). (emphasis = time, it's finished)

    It's also a question where you want to put the emphasis on.

    I've just met her. (emphasis = activity, it's finished as well)

    This might be interesting for you:

    http://www.usingenglish.com/forum/as...-tenses-2.html

    Hope that helps
    Snowcake
    Last edited by Snowcake; 28-Mar-2008 at 20:47.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Present perfect with past time

    In those sentences, you have not used a 'finished time expression'

    since 1985 : the intervening time period between 1985 and now.

    for 10 years : for the specified period of time of 10 years. 'He went to prison in 1985 for 10 years'.

    for the past 10 years : for the specified period from now, to 10 years ago.

    I've just met her : Yes. This is present perfect tense, and indicates a very recent past event and stresses the significance that there has therefore only been a short intervening period to time between then and now. The whole sentence might be: "I've only just met her so I can't tell whether it will develop into a relationship or not." That is, the intervening period from when we met to now is too short for two people to really get to know each other well.
    Last edited by David L.; 28-Mar-2008 at 21:01.

  4. #4
    greystroke is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: Present perfect with past time

    [quote=David L.;271945]In those sentences, you have not used a 'finished time expression'

    since 1985 : the intervening time period between 1985 and now.

    for 10 years : for the specified period of time of 10 years. 'He went to prison in 1985 for 10 years'.

    Thanks David,

    I realized it after i wrote these sentences. However, I often read and listen to sentences like this: " We are pleased to tell you that we have received your payment on 19th Mar , 2008."
    Another e.g. " Last year alone, we've made great strides ----."Are these incorrect? Or would it be more correct to say, the present perfect is 'occassionally used with a finished time expression?'

    Arun

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